Seen my lady home las’ night,
Jump back, honey, jump back.
Hel’ huh han’ an’ sque’z it tight,
Jump back, honey, jump back.
Hyeahd huh sigh a little sigh,
Seen a light gleam f’om huh eye,
An’ a smile go flittin’ by —
Jump back, honey, jump back.
Hyeahd de win’ blow thoo de pine,
Jump back, honey, jump back.
Mockin’-bird was singin’ fine,
Jump back, honey, jump back.
An’ my hea’t was beatin’ so,
When I reached my lady’s do’,
Dat I could n’t ba’ to go —
Jump back, honey, jump back.

Put my ahm aroun’ huh wais’,
Jump back, honey, jump back.
Raised huh lips an’ took a tase,
Jump back, honey, jump back.
Love me, honey, love me true?
Love me well ez I love you?
An’ she answe’d, “‘Cose I do”–
Jump back, honey, jump back.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Paul Laurence Dunbar's poem A Negro Love Song

2 Comments

  1. Rasheeda K. Ali says:

    This is a fun piece to work especilly with the youth. The “hook” in this song is “Jump back, honey, jump back!” If presented to a crowd, allowing the “audience” to recite the “hook” in unison creates a lasting impression. It is often requested!

  2. Brian Pugh says:

    The lyrics of this poem were used, with very little alteration, in 1956 by rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Gene Vincent on his first album under the title “Jump Back, Honey, Jump Back” with composer credit going to someone called Brooks.

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