“They called it Annandale-and I was there
To flourish, to find words, and to attend:
Liar, physician, hypocrite, and friend,
I watched him; and the sight was not so fair
As one or two that I have seen elsewhere:
An apparatus not for me to mend-
A wreck, with hell between him and the end,
Remained of Annandale; and I was there.

“I knew the ruin as I knew the man;
So put the two together, if you can,
Remembering the worst you know of me.
Now view yourself as I was, on the spot-
With a slight kind of engine. Do you see?
Like this … You wouldn’t hang me? I thought not.”

Analysis, meaning and summary of Edwin Arlington Robinson's poem How Annandale Went Out

2 Comments

  1. Tondoleo Breckenridge says:

    Diane Meredith writes:
    I believe this poem is a physician’s testimony in front of a judge or jury
    explaining why he had to euthanize his friend Annandale, who was nothing
    but a wreck of a man with much suffering left to endure before death.

    Believe? Nay, Madam, ’tis. I know not believe.

  2. Diane Meredith says:

    I believe this poem is a physician’s testimony in front of a judge or jury explaining why he had to euthanize his friend Annandale, who was nothing but a wreck of a man with much suffering left to endure before death.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Do you have any comments, criticism, paraphrasis or analysis of this poem that you feel would assist other visitors in understanding the meaning or the theme of this poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson better? If accepted, your analysis will be added to this page of American Poems. Together we can build a wealth of information, but it will take some discipline and determination.