Obscurely yet most surely called to praise,
As sometimes summer calls us all, I said
The hills are heavens full of branching ways
Where star-nosed moles fly overhead the dead;
I said the trees are mines in air, I said
See how the sparrow burrows in the sky!
And then I wondered why this mad instead
Perverts our praise to uncreation, why
Such savour’s in this wrenching things awry.
Does sense so stale that it must needs derange
The world to know it? To a praiseful eye
Should it not be enough of fresh and strange
That trees grow green, and moles can course
in clay,
And sparrows sweep the ceiling of our day?

Analysis, meaning and summary of Richard Wilbur's poem Praise In Summer

1 Comment

  1. Joel Schafer Garson says:

    Though things are what they seem, imagination sometimes makes them sing. In the world of living things,poets take care and soundly create a force of placements that hardly bring what thought has seen. So in a world where balance is a perfect choice for focus, the poet is the pivot to his notice.

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