In broad daylight, and at noon,
Yesterday I saw the moon
Sailing high, but faint and white,
As a schoolboy’s paper kite.

In broad daylight, yesterday,
I read a poet’s mystic lay;
And it seemed to me at most
As a phantom, or a ghost.

But at length the feverish day
Like a passion died away,
And the night, serene and still,
Fell on village, vale, and hill.

Then the moon, in all her pride,
Like a spirit glorified,
Filled and overflowed the night
With revelations of her light.

And the Poet’s song again
Passed like music through my brain;
Night interpreted to me
All its grace and mystery.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem Daylight and Moonlight

1 Comment

  1. ZBird says:

    This poem is beautiful. I believe Longfellow truly captures the essence of what poetry is in this poem. It is something that maybe, only poets and other artists can appreciate, but it is beautiful.

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