To be intoned, all but the two italicized lines, which are to be spoken in a snappy, matter-of-fact way.

Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong.
Here lies a kitten good, who kept
A kitten’s proper place.
He stole no pantry eatables,
Nor scratched the baby’s face.
He let the alley-cats alone.
He had no yowling vice.
His shirt was always laundried well,
He freed the house of mice.
Until his death he had not caused
His little mistress tears,
He wore his ribbon prettily,
He washed behind his ears.
Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Vachel Lindsay's poem A Dirge for a Righteous Kitten

1 Comment

  1. tirra~lirra says:

    really, could there be a more lovely title? it’s like t.s. eliot’s practical cats…the topic that is…

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