En robe de parade.
Samain

Like a skien of loose silk blown against a wall
She walks by the railing of a path in Kensington Gardens,
And she is dying piece-meal
of a sort of emotional anaemia.

And round about there is a rabble
Of the filthy, sturdy, unkillable infants of the very poor.
They shall inherit the earth.

In her is the end of breeding.
Her boredom is exquisite and excessive.
She would like some one to speak to her,
And is almost afraid that I
will commit that indiscretion.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Ezra Pound's poem The Garden

21 Comments

  1. Craig Campbell says:

    Im in 7th grade at a school in Ann Arbor Michigan. I love this poem. It is a really good poem. But I seriously do not know anything about it. Can anyone tell me what it is about

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