Who occupies this House?
A Stranger I must judge
Since No one know His Circumstance —
‘Tis well the name and age

Are writ upon the Door
Or I should fear to pause
Where not so much as Honest Dog
Approach encourages.

It seems a curious Town —
Some Houses very old,
Some — newly raised this Afternoon,
Were I compelled to build

It should not be among
Inhabitants so still
But where the Birds assemble
And Boys were possible.

Before Myself was born
‘Twas settled, so they say,
A Territory for the Ghosts —
And Squirrels, formerly.

Until a Pioneer, as
Settlers often do
Liking the quiet of the Place
Attracted more unto —

And from a Settlement
A Capital has grown
Distinguished for the gravity
Of every Citizen.

The Owner of this House
A Stranger He must be —
Eternity’s Acquaintances
Are mostly so — to me.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Emily Dickinson's poem Who occupies this House?

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