There came a Day at Summer’s full,
Entirely for me —
I thought that such were for the Saints,
Where Resurrections — be —

The Sun, as common, went abroad,
The flowers, accustomed, blew,
As if no soul the solstice passed
That maketh all things new —

The time was scarce profaned, by speech —
The symbol of a word
Was needless, as at Sacrament,
The Wardrobe — of our Lord —

Each was to each The Sealed Church,
Permitted to commune this — time —
Lest we too awkward show
At Supper of the Lamb.

The Hours slid fast — as Hours will,
Clutched tight, by greedy hands —
So faces on two Decks, look back,
Bound to opposing lands —

And so when all the time had leaked,
Without external sound
Each bound the Other’s Crucifix —
We gave no other Bond —

Sufficient troth, that we shall rise —
Deposed — at length, the Grave —
To that new Marriage,
Justified — through Calvaries of Love —

Analysis, meaning and summary of Emily Dickinson's poem There came a Day at Summer’s full

5 Comments

  1. victor says:

    On coming across the facsimile of the above poem in Project Gutenberg Complete edition files, I decided to post my reading of it, not knowing if there was another copy by the author, a later one.

    Then Came a Day –
    At Summer`s full –
    Entirely for me –
    I thought that such were for the Saints –
    When Ressurection – be –

    The Sun – as common went abroad –
    The flowers – accostumed -blew –
    As if no soul – that solstice passed –
    Which makes all Things – new –

    The time was scarce – profaned by speech –
    The falling of a word
    Was needless – as at Sacrament –
    The Wardrobe – of our Lord!

    Each was to each – the Sealed Church –
    Permitted to Commune this (underscored) time –
    Lest we too Awkward show –
    At Supper of “The Lamb” –

    The hours slid fast –
    As hours will –
    Clutched tight –
    By greedy hands –
    So – faces on two Decks
    Look back
    Bound to opposing lands –

    And so when all the time had leaked –
    Without external sound –
    Each found the other`s Crucifix –
    We gave no other Bond –

    Sufficient troth –
    That we shall rise (underscored)-
    Deposed – At lenght the Grave –
    To that new Marriage –
    Justified –
    Through Calvaries – of Love!

  2. frumpo says:

    A day of revelation came to me, and I am not a regular Christian. Everything was normal. There was no sermon, symbol, or sacrament. Everyone was included in the common Meal. Time moved quickly, though we wanted it to last forever. And as we traded crucifixes (our token of sacrificial love), I realized that I am secure in the knowledge of our future union at death because of our loving sacrifices for each other.

  3. frumpo says:

    A day of revelation came to me, and I am not a regular Christian. Everything was normal. There was no sermon, symbol, or sacrament. Everyone was included in the common Meal. Time moved quickly, though we wanted it to last forever. And as we traded crucifixes (our token of sacrificial love), I realized that I am secure in the knowledge of our future union at death because of our loving sacrifices for each other.

  4. chaitali maitra says:

    Thank you so much for giving such an honour. I feel that this poem is trying to say that every life has to pass through certain definite stages, often painful, to reach the final stage of death. This is understood as the culmination or marriage with god, based on selfless love. The summer season, of which the poet is the part beautiful enough, to make her realise this. The poem has strong christia overtones, which establish the poet’s conviction of fulfilment in life.

  5. Blahdy di Blah-Blah says:

    Well, well, well. I can’t believe I am the first one to comment on this poem. I feel it is a great honor to be the first one listed on this comment page. Thank you for this great honor. I think she’s trying to say that nature can be like an almost religious experience of sorts. You see, she says that nature is so beautiful that only the holiest people should behold it.

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