If all the year was summer-time,
And all the aim of life
Was just to lilt on like a rhyme —
Then I would be your wife.

If all the days were August days,
And crowned with golden weather,
How happy then through green-clad ways
We two could stray together!

If all the nights were moonlit nights,
And we had naught to do
But just to sit and plan delights,
Then I would be with you.

If life was all a summer fete,
Its soberest pace the “glide, ”
Then I would choose you for my mate,
And keep you at my side.

But winter makes full half the year,
And labour half of life,
And all the laughter and good cheer
Gives place to wearing strife.

Days will grow cold, and moons wax old,
And then a heart that’s true
Is better far than grace or gold —
And so, my love, adieu!
I cannot wed with you.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Ella Wheeler Wilcox's poem An Answer

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