I know I am but summer to your heart,
And not the full four seasons of the year;
And you must welcome from another part
Such noble moods as are not mine, my dear.
No gracious weight of golden fruits to sell
Have I, nor any wise and wintry thing;
And I have loved you all too long and well
To carry still the high sweet breast of Spring.
Wherefore I say: O love, as summer goes,
I must be gone, steal forth with silent drums,
That you may hail anew the bird and rose
When I come back to you, as summer comes.
Else will you seek, at some not distant time,
Even your summer in another clime.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Edna St. Vincent Millay's poem I Know I Am But Summer To Your Heart

2 Comments

  1. Amanda J says:

    I know I am but summer to your heart,
    I AM BUT A ONE THING THAT YOU NEED
    And not the full four seasons of the year;
    NOT EVERYTHING
    And you must welcome from another part
    Such noble moods as are not mine, my dear.
    YOU MUST FIND WHAT I LACK IN OTHERS
    No gracious weight of golden fruits to sell
    Have I, nor any wise and wintry thing;
    I AM NOT THESE THINGS (ATTRACTIVE? WISE?)
    And I have loved you all too long and well
    To carry still the high sweet breast of Spring.
    AND WE ARE TOO FAMILIAR TO BE YOUNG AND EXCITING
    Wherefore I say: O love, as summer goes,
    I must be gone, steal forth with silent drums,
    SO I WILL GO QUIETLY
    That you may hail anew the bird and rose
    When I come back to you, as summer comes.
    SO YOU WILL APPRECIATE WHAT I HAVE TO OFFER WHEN IT IS MY TURN AGAIN
    Else will you seek, at some not distant time,
    Even your summer in another clime.
    OTHERWISE, YOU WILL SOON TIRE OF ME COMPLETELY AND FIND ANOTHER PERSON TO GIVE YOU THE THINGS I DO.

  2. Carla Marie says:

    I know I am but summer to your heart,
    I KNOW I AM NOT MUCH OF A PERSON
    And not the full four seasons of the year;
    NOT THE KIND OF PERSON YOU WANT
    And you must welcome from another part
    THERE ARE OTHERS YOU CAN WELCOME
    Such noble moods as are not mine, my dear.
    No gracious weight of golden fruits to sell
    I HAVE NOT MUCH TO GIVE YOU
    Have I, nor any wise and wintry thing;
    And I have loved you all too long and well
    To carry still the high sweet breast of Spring.
    Wherefore I say: O love, as summer goes,
    I MUST GET OVER YOU
    I must be gone, steal forth with silent drums,
    That you may hail anew the bird and rose
    SO YOU CAN SEE OTHERS
    When I come back to you, as summer comes.
    Else will you seek, at some not distant time,
    Even your summer in another clime.
    YOU MIGHT MISS ME

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