We are born with luck
which is to say with gold in our mouth.
As new and smooth as a grape,
as pure as a pond in Alaska,
as good as the stem of a green bean–
we are born and that ought to be enough,
we ought to be able to carry on from that
but one must learn about evil,
learn what is subhuman,
learn how the blood pops out like a scream,
one must see the night
before one can realize the day,
one must listen hard to the animal within,
one must walk like a sleepwalker
on the edge of a roof,
one must throw some part of her body
into the devil’s mouth.
Odd stuff, you’d say.
But I’d say
you must die a little,
have a book of matches go off in your hand,
see your best friend copying your exam,
visit an Indian reservation and see
their plastic feathers,
the dead dream.
One must be a prisoner just once to hear
the lock twist into his gut.
After all that
one is free to grasp at the trees, the stones,
the sky, the birds that make sense out of air.
But even in a telephone booth
evil can seep out of the receiver
and we must cover it with a mattress,
and then tear it from its roots
and bury it,
bury it.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Anne Sexton's poem The Evil Seekers

1 Comment

  1. Melissa says:

    I thought that this poem related closely to Paulo Coehlo’s book The Devil and Miss Prym. The book focuses on the theme of humanity and the issues revolving around good versus evil. I think that this poem has real substance to it and is very meaningful in terms of questioning the essence of humanity and whether humans in actual fact, are all cheats and liars.

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