No more with overflowing light
Shall fill the eyes that now are faded,
Nor shall another’s fringe with night
Their woman-hidden world as they did.

No more shall quiver down the days
The flowing wonder of her ways,
Whereof no language may requite
The shifting and the many-shaded.

The grace, divine, definitive,
Clings only as a faint forestalling;
The laugh that love could not forgive
Is hushed, and answers to no calling;
The forehead and the little ears
Have gone where Saturn keeps the years;
The breast where roses could not live
Has done with rising and with falling.

The beauty, shattered by the laws
That have creation in their keeping,
No longer trembles at applause,
Or over children that are sleeping;
And we who delve in beauty’s lore
Know all that we have known before
Of what inexorable cause
Makes Time so vicious in his reaping.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Edwin Arlington Robinson's poem For a Dead Lady

1 Comment

  1. Sasaki Chasofito says:

    This poem uses complex wordplay to provoke its message, however, the message may be hard to understand to most. The poem’s basic output is the fact that Robinson is talking about a dead lady and going into deep description about her death. He also reminices about the poem itself, which I find very intresting. If this was based on life exprience, this person probably meant more to him than anything.

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