An Old Man’s Thought of School.

AN old man’s thought of School;
An old man, gathering youthful memories and blooms, that youth itself cannot.

Now only do I know you!
O fair auroral skies! O morning dew upon the grass!

And these I see—these sparkling eyes,
These stores of mystic meaning—these young lives,
Building, equipping, like a fleet of ships—immortal ships!
Soon to sail out over the measureless seas,
On the Soul’s voyage.

Only a lot of boys and girls?
Only the tiresome spelling, writing, ciphering classes?
Only a Public School?

Ah more—infinitely more;
(As George Fox rais’d his warning cry, “Is it this pile of brick and
mortar—these dead floors, windows, rails—you call the church?
Why this is not the church at all—the Church is living, ever living Souls.”)

And you, America,
Cast you the real reckoning for your present?
The lights and shadows of your future—good or evil?
To girlhood, boyhood look—the Teacher and the School.

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1 Comment

  1. kathywhitworth says:

    Howard Hanson has incorporated this poem into a choral work entitled “Song of Democracy.” I am trying to determine which poem is used for the second portion of the piece. It begins with “Sail, sail thy best, ship of Democracy! Of value is thy freignt – tis not the Present only, the past is also stored in thee…” Could someone post the title/collection of the final poem? Thanks. KWhit

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