I became a criminal when I fell in love.
Before that I was a waitress.

I didn’t want to go to Chicago with you.
I wanted to marry you, I wanted
Your wife to suffer.

I wanted her life to be like a play
In which all the parts are sad parts.

Does a good person
Think this way? I deserve

Credit for my courage–

I sat in the dark on your front porch.
Everything was clear to me:
If your wife wouldn’t let you go
That proved she didn’t love you.
If she loved you
Wouldn’t she want you to be happy?

I think now
If I felt less I would be
A better person. I was
A good waitress.
I could carry eight drinks.

I used to tell you my dreams.
Last night I saw a woman sitting in a dark bus–
In the dream, she’s weeping, the bus she’s on
Is moving away. With one hand
She’s waving; the other strokes
An egg carton full of babies.

The dream doesn’t rescue the maiden.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Louise Glück's poem Siren

1 Comment

  1. Jason Henry Simon-Bierenbaum says:

    This poem is ridiculously amazing. It works even better in the context of “Meadowlands”, her book that any person who has ever enjoyed poetry or watched a relationship disintegrate will cherish. As she is such a master of every minute detail, I request you change your presentation of this poem. You capitalize the beginning of every line. In her book she only capitalizes where one would in regular sentences. Please fix the format to the one that she is using for a reason.

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