Will there really be a “Morning”?
Is there such a thing as “Day”?
Could I see it from the mountains
If I were as tall as they?

Has it feet like Water lilies?
Has it feathers like a Bird?
Is it brought from famous countries
Of which I have never heard?

Oh some Scholar! Oh some Sailor!
Oh some Wise Men from the skies!
Please to tell a little Pilgrim
Where the place called “Morning” lies!

Analysis, meaning and summary of the poem by

15 Comments

  1. ashlyn wludyka says:

    i think this poem is about a little boy or girl that gets lost in a bad dream and wants to know if he or she will ever get out of her or his dream while wondering if there will ever be another morning for them…im a ten yr old.

  2. Mary says:

    Last night we attended a local school concert and an 11 yr. old boy sang this song as a soloist. I watched his mother in her wheelchair watch him with swelling pride. Just a few days prior she received a visit from hospice and was told she has 6 months or less to live. The angels swirled around as the words flowed from this little boy to his mother.

  3. Jon says:

    Do you think that maybe “Morning” and “Day” could refer to Heaven after dying? The word “Pilgrim” suggests a religious traveler. And the idea of a “Water Lily” is a plant that floats on water with “feet”? How odd to put it that way. It has been said that Jesus walked on water. Also, maybe the “feathers” of the “Bird” may refer to angels. Maybe I am way off on this. Does anyone out there know what this poem is really about? Maybe she questions if there is reincarnation. Has anyone out there ever heard of this interpretation?

  4. hailey says:

    gotta recite this poem in front of hole class on friday:[

  5. Kimberly says:

    I love this poem and emily is someone i look up to, regueardless if she lived in her house losing contact with people everyday. She was an amazing poet and i hope to one day be just like her. Every time i read her poems i feel i understand exactly how she felt. So if anyone has something bad to say then keep it to yourself; no one wants to hear your trash talk about one of the best poets of all time.

  6. frumpo says:

    Is heaven real?

  7. Jean-Claude Laforge says:

    Do you know that ” Will there really be a morning?” is also the title of a very moving autobiography by Frances Farmer, who was a Hollywood star in the 30’s, before being sent to a lunatic asylum. This was her favorite poem and reflected her own life.

  8. samantha says:

    This poen is pretty bad bloke but im a thinkind will there really be an end to this song!!!!

  9. Joanna says:

    There are probably several settings of this poem, but Craig Hella Johnson’s SA version is spectacularly beautiful.
    For Jeremy – if you’ve never seen a lily pad it is an amazing round floating object, not dissimilar to a webbed foot. Of course it is the lightest footprint ever, floating on water, as gentle as her other metaphor of a bird’s feather. I think it is an incredible way to envision a “morning” or awakening when you have been secluded (as Dickinson was), depressed, or “asleep” to life.

  10. Jeremy says:

    I have to answer a question on how water lilies have “feet” according to Emily Dickinson, anyone has suggestions?

  11. Jada says:

    This poem is so deep and beautiful. I love it!!

  12. Brian says:

    This comment section should be about the POEM not the song! The poem by Dickinson should be discussed here.

  13. shelly says:

    yes we are singing it now and its beautiful

  14. Kathrine says:

    I love this!

  15. cate says:

    Has anyone heard this song? My Choir sang it Beautifuly. Emily you are just amazing!

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