OH, Prue she has a patient man,
And Joan a gentle lover,
And Agatha’s Arth’ is a hug-the-hearth,­
But my true love’s a rover!

Mig, her man’s as good as cheese
And honest as a briar,
Sue tells her love what he’s thinking of,­
But my dear lad’s a liar!

Oh, Sue and Prue and Agatha
Are thick with Mig and Joan!
They bite their threads and shake their heads
And gnaw my name like a bone;

And Prue says, “Mine’s a patient man,
As never snaps me up,”
And Agatha, “Arth’ is a hug-the-hearth,
Could live content in a cup,”

Sue’s man’s mind is like good jell­
All one color, and clear­
And Mig’s no call to think at all
What’s to come next year,

While Joan makes boast of a gentle lad,
That’s troubled with that and this;­
But they all would give the life they live
For a look from the man I kiss!

Cold he slants his eyes about,
And few enough’s his choice,­
Though he’d slip me clean for a nun, or a queen,
Or a beggar with knots in her voice,­

And Agatha will turn awake
While her good man sleeps sound,
And Mig and Sue and Joan and Prue
Will hear the clock strike round,

For Prue she has a patient man,
As asks not when or why,
And Mig and Sue have naught to do
But peep who’s passing by,

Joan is paired with a putterer
That bastes and tastes and salts,
And Agatha’s Arth’ is a hug-the-hearth,­
But my true love is false!

Analysis, meaning and summary of Edna St. Vincent Millay's poem She is Overheard Singing

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