The earth keeps some vibration going
There in your heart, and that is you.
And if the people find you can fiddle,
Why, fiddle you must and for all your life.
What do you see, a harvest ofclover?
Or a meadow to awlk through to the river?
The wind’s in the corn; you rub your hands
for beeves hereafter ready for market;
Or else you hear the rustle of skirts
Like the girls when dancing at Little Grove.
To Cooney Potter a pillar of dust
Or whirling leaves meant ruinous drouth;
They looked to me like Red-Head Sammy
Stepping it off, to “Toor-a-Loor.”
How could I till my forty acres
Not to speak of getting more,
With a medley of horns, bassoons and piccolos
Stirred in my brain by crows androbins
And the creak of a wind-mill—only these?
And I never started to plow in my life
That some one did not stop in the road
And tkae me away to a dance or picnic.
I ended up with forty acres;
I ended up with a broken fiddle—
And a broken laugh, and a thousand memories.
And not a single regret.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Edgar Lee Masters's poem Fiddler Jones

3 Comments

  1. chase hazen says:

    i love this poem. it is awesome and action packedand it makes me feel good about myself and my lover. i read it everyday before school because it gives me strength to live.

  2. Rob lamb says:

    Excellent poem – makes a great song – if youre a musician, with the sounds in your head, like me.

  3. kathryn says:

    I thought the last part was good!!!About how you had a broken fiddle and memories.I liked it a lot.But before you post anythingelse check your spelling.and punctuation

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