A vagueness comes over everything,
as though proving color and contour
alike dispensable: the lighthouse
extinct, the islands’ spruce-tips
drunk up like milk in the
universal emulsion; houses
reverting into the lost
and forgotten; granite
subsumed, a rumor
in a mumble of ocean.
Tactile
definition, however, has not been
totally banished: hanging
tassel by tassel, panicled
foxtail and needlegrass,
dropseed, furred hawkweed,
and last season’s rose-hips
are vested in silenced
chimes of the finest,
clearest sea-crystal.
Opacity
opens up rooms, a showcase
for the hueless moonflower
corolla, as Georgia
O’Keefe might have seen it,
of foghorns; the nodding
campanula of bell buoys;
the ticking, linear
filigree of bird voices.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Amy Clampitt's poem Fog

1 Comment

  1. Victor Frost says:

    Please fix the spelling of O’Keeffe’s name. In a song cycle I began with this poem, for baritone and string quartet, I followed it immediately (“attacca,” as we say) by “Gradual Clearing.”

    Similarly, I feel that these two wonderful poems should always be anthologized together.

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