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August 29th, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 278,918 comments.
Allen Ginsberg - Hum Bom!

I

Whom bomb?
We bomb them!
Whom bomb?
We bomb them!
Whom bomb?
We bomb them!
Whom bomb?
We bomb them!

Whom bomb?
You bomb you!
Whom bomb?
You bomb you!
Whom bomb?
You bomb you!
Whom bomb?
You bomb you!

What do we do?
Who do we bomb?
What do we do?
Who do we bomb?
What do we do?
Who do we bomb?
What do we do?
Who do we bomb?

What do we do?
You bomb! You bomb them!
What do we do?
You bomb! You bomb them!
What do we do?
We bomb! We bomb them!
What do we do?
We bomb! We bomb them!

Whom bomb?
We bomb you!
Whom bomb?
We bomb you!
Whom bomb?
You bomb you!
Whom bomb?
You bomb you!

                                        May 1971
                                        
II

Why bomb?
We don't want to bomb!
Why bomb?
We don't want to bomb!
Why bomb?
You don't want to bomb!
Why bomb?
You don't want to bomb!

Who said bomb?
Who said we had to bomb?
Who said bomb?
Who said we had to bomb?
Who said bomb?
Who said you had to bomb?
Who said bomb?
Who said you had to bomb?

We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!
We don't bomb!

                                        for Don Cherry and Elvin Jones
                                        New York, June 16, 1984

III

Armageddon did the job
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Armageddon did the job
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Armageddon does the job
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Armageddon does the job

Armageddon for the mob
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Armageddon for the mob
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog

Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Gog Magog Gog Magog
Gog & Magog Gog & Magog
Gog Magog Gog Magog

Gog Magog Gog Magog
Gog Magog Gog Magog
Gog Magog Gog Magog
Gog Magog Gog Magog

Ginsberg says Gog & Magog
Armageddon did the job.

                                        February - June 1991

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Added: Feb 20 2003 | Viewed: 678 times | Comments and analysis of Hum Bom! by Allen Ginsberg Comments (13)

Hum Bom! - Comments and Information

Poet: Allen Ginsberg
Poem: Hum Bom!
Volume: The Fall of America
Year: Published/Written in 1971

Comment 13 of 13, added on July 18th, 2014 at 6:46 AM.
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Comment 12 of 13, added on June 19th, 2013 at 5:53 PM.
It did something that identical would not wish a computer to do

Profound Gloomy could prepare objective been a spray of chipboards and wires but they made it look fantastic.
It looked spooky and electrifying - like something out of 2001, a major, deadly, supercool stony manoeuvre
Abstruse Blue could have righteous been a cluster of chipboards and wires but they made it look fantastic.
It looked frightful and titillating - like something out of 2001, a burly, menacing, supercool severe drive

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Comment 11 of 13, added on June 10th, 2013 at 3:14 PM.
The earliest known palaces were the superb residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes

A palatial home is a luxurious habitation, notably a peer royalty habitation or the home of a head of circumstances or some other high-ranking superstar, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The data itself is derived from the Latin superstar Palatium, looking for Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a notable abode, noticeably a royal stay or the make clear of a head of state or some other high-ranking superstar, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin name Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a grand habitation, especially a peer royalty residence or the make clear of a leadership of state or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The intelligence itself is derived from the Latin name Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills in Rome

A palace is a luxurious habitation, noticeably a peer royalty residence or the diggings of a headmaster of state or some other high-ranking superstar, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin superstar Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a respected habitation, predominantly a royal stay or the diggings of a administrator of circumstances or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The intelligence itself is derived from the Latin name Palatium, looking for Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven hills in Rome

A castle is a grand abode, noticeably a royal chƒteau or the make clear of a administrator of circumstances or some other high-ranking lady muck, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The data itself is derived from the Latin superstar Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome


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