All summer I heard them
rustling in the shrubbery,
outracing me from tier
to tier in my garden,
a whisper among the viburnums,
a signal flashed from the hedgerow,
a shadow pulsing
in the barberry thicket.
Now that the nights are chill
and the annuals spent,
I should have thought them gone,
in a torpor of blood
slipped to the nether world
before the sickle frost.
Not so. In the deceptive balm
of noon, as if defiant of the curse
that spoiled another garden,
these two appear on show
through a narrow slit
in the dense green brocade
of a north-country spruce,
dangling head-down, entwined
in a brazen love-knot.
I put out my hand and stroke
the fine, dry grit of their skins.
After all,
we are partners in this land,
co-signers of a covenant.
At my touch the wild
braid of creation
trembles.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Stanley Kunitz's poem The Snakes of September

2 Comments

  1. boris says:

    This is a wonderful poem which combines imagery,rhythm,and musical flavor into an extraordinary piece of art.

  2. amy says:

    something ordinary: a garden, snakes, a gardener
    something mythical: a garden, snakes, the Creator
    a poem that bridges the two ideas together without shame.

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