The word I spoke in anger
weighs less than a parsley seed,
but a road runs through it
that leads to my grave,
that bought-and-paid-for lot
on a salt-sprayed hill in Truro
where the scrub pines
overlook the bay.
Half-way I’m dead enough,
strayed from my own nature
and my fierce hold on life.
If I could cry, I’d cry,
but I’m too old to be
anybody’s child.
Liebchen,
with whom should I quarrel
except in the hiss of love,
that harsh, irregular flame?

Analysis, meaning and summary of Stanley Kunitz's poem The Quarrel

1 Comment

  1. M. Alexander says:

    An abortive start on an apology to a lover? A denial of being inexplicably lost to love.

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