I had come to the house, in a cave of trees,
Facing a sheer sky.
Everything moved, — a bell hung ready to strike,
Sun and reflection wheeled by.

When the bare eyes were before me
And the hissing hair,
Held up at a window, seen through a door.
The stiff bald eyes, the serpents on the forehead
Formed in the air.

This is a dead scene forever now.
Nothing will ever stir.
The end will never brighten it more than this,
Nor the rain blur.

The water will always fall, and will not fall,
And the tipped bell make no sound.
The grass will always be growing for hay
Deep on the ground.

And I shall stand here like a shadow
Under the great balanced day,
My eyes on the yellow dust, that was lifting in the wind,
And does not drift away.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Louise Bogan's poem Medusa

4 Comments

  1. LOMA FAID says:

    A STRUGGLING BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH

  2. LOMA FAID says:

    IN THESE POEM THERE IS A STRUGGLE BETWEEN LIFE AND ARRATINAS THE POET HERE IS NARRATING AND DESCRIBING HER JOURNY FROM LIFE TO DEATH.THE PMEDUSA POWER MAKES THE POET HOPED TO STEAL THESE POWER FROM HER TO BECOME IMMORTAL AND DELAY HER TIME OF DEATH,SO THERE IS A CONNECTION BETWEEN THE POETESS AND THE FEMAL MYTH;MEDUSA

  3. noran says:

    tis poem is so woderful and i love louis bogan so much nada

  4. George Hershwin says:

    This poem could be about either seeing something horrible or about the abstractness of war. How war affects us all and each day is unbalanced by it.

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