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American Poems: Kindle eBooks: The Sentry (An Elvis Cole Novel Book 12)
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 Home » Kindle eBooks » The Sentry (An Elvis Cole Novel Book 12)

The Sentry (An Elvis Cole Novel Book 12)

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  • Sales Rank:7,795
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Language:English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Edition:Reprint
  • Pages:321
  • Publication Date:January 11, 2011
  • ASIN:B00475AS2O


Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
After Joe Pike saves a man's life, the man's family seems oddly resentful. Maybe because they're not who they seem to be-including the seductive Dru. But it's more than a charade-it's a trap. And Pike's already been hooked...


Amazon.com Review
T. Jefferson Parker and Robert Crais: Author One-on-One

In this Amazon exclusive, we brought together blockbuster authors T. Jefferson Parker and Robert Crais and asked them to interview each other.

T. Jefferson Parker is one of only three writers to be awarded the Edgar Award for Best Novel more than once and the bestselling author of numerous novels, including Iron River. Parker lives with his family in Southern California.

Read on to see T. Jefferson Parker's questions for Robert Crais, or turn the tables to see what Crais asked Parker.

T. Jefferson Parker Parker: You’ve got a new novel coming out in January of 2011. I haven’t read it yet, so can you tell me a bit about it?

Crais: It's a Joe Pike novel. Wasn't supposed to be, so I was taken by surprise, but that's the way Pike is. I planned to follow my last book, The First Rule, with an Elvis Cole novel, but I saw Pike meet a woman in Venice, California, a few moments after Pike saved her uncle from a robbery. Ideas for books come to me that way--I'll see an image. The way Pike looked at her, I knew right away I had to follow their story. So it's a love story, but not your usual love story--it's a Joe Pike love story. As the Kirkus review said, "Prepare the body bags."

Parker: Did you have any surprises as you wrote the book?

Crais: A character named Daniel. Daniel is a hit man who is after the woman Pike is falling for. He is not your typical hit man. Daniel is very strange dude, and the creepiest character I've ever created. When I wrote his first scene, I sat back, and said, whoa, where did this guy come from?

Parker: You write terrific heroes and terrific villains. How do you get inside their heads, learn their methods and tricks?

Crais: The answer would scare you. Really.

Robert Crais Parker: Can you describe a typical work day?

Crais: It's pretty boring. I get up, go for a hike or work out because I like to get the exercise out of the way, then I sit down to work. The work requires discipline because there are so many distractions. Though, honestly, I can't think of a better way to spend my time than hanging out with Joe Pike and Elvis Cole and even strange and dangerous characters like Daniel.

Parker: Okay, when all the work is done (is it ever?) what do you do for plain-old, flat-out fun?

Crais: Anything outside. Hiking, scuba diving, flying. As a writer, I spend most of my time inside, staring at my computer. When the work is finished, I want OUT. It's like being paroled.

(Photo of T. Jefferson Parker © Rebecca Lawson)
(Photo of Robert Crais © exleyfotoinc)
Synopsis
After Joe Pike saves a man's life, the man's family seems oddly resentful. Maybe because they're not who they seem to be-including the seductive Dru. But it's more than a charade-it's a trap. And Pike's already been hooked...



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