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American Poems: Books: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Annotated)
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 Home » Books » Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Annotated)

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Annotated)

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  • Sales Rank:219,280
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Language:English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Pages:293
  • Publication Date:May 29, 2013
  • ASIN:B00D39ONEY


Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
This ebook includes a biographical introduction, a short, critical analysis of Twain and a brief introduction to this work.

Published in 1884 by Chatto and Windus in Britain and then in 1885 by Charles L. Webster in the United States, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was Twain's fourth novel and in literary terms his best. The plot takes on aspects of his familiar travelogues with the principal characters, here Huck Finn and the slave Jim, using the Mississippi to move through different parts of the United States. Where Twain moves past this basic premise is to introduce a satirical edge taking in the slave-owning culture and its comparison to a slave who is intelligent and well-meaning.

The book was criticised heavily in the twentieth century for expressing a racial aspect, principally through its language which involves the use of the word 'nigger'. Yet such criticism is mostly devoid of context, ignoring when the novel was written and, more importantly, Twain's intention of attacking the slave-owning culture that he'd witnessed in the Confederacy. Outside the politics, from a purely literary standpoint, the novel is also open to criticism for Twain's decision to continue the narrative following Jim's sale 'down the river'. It feels as though Twain might have finished the book there and that he chose not to, offering instead the introduction of Tom Sawyer to provide a resolution that is at times convoluted.

What counts here is that Twain is providing a wholly different mythology to the lone gunman notion that has been introduced during the course of the twentieth century. In Twain's America, the country he experienced during its formative years, real people get into scrapes, have adventures, are subject to injustices but come through it all without an epic gunfight at noon on a dusty street somewhere in the west.
Amazon.com Review
A seminal work of American Literature that still commands deep praise and still elicits controversy, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is essential to the understanding of the American soul. The recent discovery of the first half of Twain's manuscript, long thought lost, made front-page news. And this unprecedented edition, which contains for the first time omitted episodes and other variations present in the first half of the handwritten manuscript, as well as facsimile reproductions of thirty manuscript pages, is indispensable to a full understanding of the novel. The changes, deletions, and additions made in the first half of the manuscript indicate that Mark Twain frequently checked his impulse to write an even darker, more confrontational book than the one he finally published.
Synopsis
This ebook includes a biographical introduction, a short, critical analysis of Twain and a brief introduction to this work.

Published in 1884 by Chatto and Windus in Britain and then in 1885 by Charles L. Webster in the United States, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was Twain's fourth novel and in literary terms his best. The plot takes on aspects of his familiar travelogues with the principal characters, here Huck Finn and the slave Jim, using the Mississippi to move through different parts of the United States. Where Twain moves past this basic premise is to introduce a satirical edge taking in the slave-owning culture and its comparison to a slave who is intelligent and well-meaning.

The book was criticised heavily in the twentieth century for expressing a racial aspect, principally through its language which involves the use of the word 'nigger'. Yet such criticism is mostly devoid of context, ignoring when the novel was written and, more importantly, Twain's intention of attacking the slave-owning culture that he'd witnessed in the Confederacy. Outside the politics, from a purely literary standpoint, the novel is also open to criticism for Twain's decision to continue the narrative following Jim's sale 'down the river'. It feels as though Twain might have finished the book there and that he chose not to, offering instead the introduction of Tom Sawyer to provide a resolution that is at times convoluted.

What counts here is that Twain is providing a wholly different mythology to the lone gunman notion that has been introduced during the course of the twentieth century. In Twain's America, the country he experienced during its formative years, real people get into scrapes, have adventures, are subject to injustices but come through it all without an epic gunfight at noon on a dusty street somewhere in the west.

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