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American Poems: Books: The Pulpit Commentary (Classic Reprint)
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 Home » Books » The Pulpit Commentary (Classic Reprint)

The Pulpit Commentary (Classic Reprint)

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  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Pages:458
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):1.7
  • Dimensions (in):9 x 6 x 1
  • Publication Date:August 24, 2012
  • ASIN:B0099I2GU6

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Trib and the following have been called twin psalms. They begin with I he same words, are nearly of the same length, and haTe each a refrain which divides them into two portions. Formally, the chief difference between the two is that Ps. I vi. has an epilogue, or appendix (rers. 12,13), after the second refrain, to whieh there is nothing correspondent in Ps. I vii. Both psalms were written under circumstances of great distress, and the tone of thought in them is very similar. Each begins with complaint, nd earnest prayer for delireranoe, while ach ends with praise and triumph. The present psalm has a very complex heading, or title. First, it is addressed, like most of the other psalms of this book, to the chief musician, or precentor. Then it is said to be On the silent dore of far-off regions. Thirdly, it is called Michtam of Dayid, which some explain as a golden psalm composed by David. And fourthly, the occasion of its composition is declared to have been the seizure of David by the Philistines in Oath. David sauthorship may readily be accepted, for the psalm is, as Ewald says, one of the most beautiful in the Psalter. And the occasion is not to be lightly set aside; since, although no seizure of David by the Philistines of Gath is mentioned in 1S amuel, uch an event is quite conceivable; while no compiler or editor of a late date would have ventured to interpolate such a fact into the accepted history of David. The nlent dove is, no doubt, David himself, PSALMS U. who had wished for the wings of a dove (P s. I v. 6), and was compelled to be silent while he was in captivity. Yer. 1. Be merciful unto me, 0Q od; for man would swallow me up; literally, man panteth after me like a wild beast after his prey. The contrast is sharp between man (enonh, weak man )and God (E lohim, the Mighty One ). He fighting daily oppresseth me; rather, all the day lmg is he fig
(Typographical errors above are due to OCR software and don't occur in the book.)

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