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 Home » Books » The Pulpit Commentary (Classic Reprint)

The Pulpit Commentary (Classic Reprint)

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  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Pages:726
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):2.6
  • Dimensions (in):9 x 6 x 1.6
  • Publication Date:July 28, 2012
  • ASIN:B008YALGLU

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Synopsis
Galatia. Galatia was a tract of coT rntry lying on the northward part of that elcT ftted tableland which forms the central portion of the great peninsula we call Asia Minor. On the south, those uplands rest upon the long range of the Taurian Mountains running more or less parallel with the coast. On the north, they are upreared, first by theO lympus range, which, commencing in the neighbourhood of Pmsa (now Brusa), pursue a generally eastward direction, nntil, after being pierced by the river A ncharias (A karia), which rises in those highlands, they are continued by the A ladag and JJ lgaz Mountains as far as the Halys (K izil-I rmak). Anciently these lands were to a considerable extent occupied by the Phrygians, then deemed, according to Homer (I liad, iii. 185 190), one of the finest races of mankind. But in the earlier part of the third century before Christ, hordes of Gauls, after a detachment of their hosts had been repulsed in an attempt to swarm into Greece, had managed to cross the Hellespont (B.C. 279), and had poured themselves upon the western districts of Asia Minor, carrying havoc and rapine in every direction. With the details of their ensuing history we need not trouble ourselves. It is sufficient to remark that at length these wild tribes got bounded in within the limits of that country to which they gave their own name, being a district which they had wrested from its former Phrygian occupants. In the year B.C. 189 they were conquered by the Roman general. On. Manlius Vulso. The Romans, however, found it advisable io allow them for a long time to remain to a considerable degree independent, under princes of their own. One of these was theD eiotaras whose name is familiar to the readers of Cicero as a friend and a useful ally of his when Proconsul of Cilicia, and as afterwards defended by him, in his Oratio proB ege Deiotaro, when arraigned
(Typographical errors above are due to OCR software and don't occur in the book.)

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