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American Poems: Books: North and South (Classic Reprint)
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 Home » Books » North and South (Classic Reprint)

North and South (Classic Reprint)

  • List Price: $7.84
  • Buy New: $7.06
  • as of 11/26/2014 00:51 EST details
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In Stock
  • Seller:Amazon.com
  • Sales Rank:3,537,277
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Pages:154
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.6
  • Dimensions (in):9 x 6 x 0.4
  • Publication Date:July 17, 2012
  • ASIN:B008WGFGBW
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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Ew Tn! said Margaret, gently, Edith! But, as Margaret half suspected, Edith had fallen asleep. She,lay curled up on the sofa in the hack drawing-room in Harley Street, looking very lovely in her white muslin and blue ribbons. If Titania had ever been dressed in white muslin and blue ribbons, and fallen asleep on a crimson damask sofa in a. back drawingroom, Edith might have been taken for her. Margaret was struck afresh by her cousins beauty. They had grown up together from childhood, and all along Edith had been remarked upon by every one, except Margaret, for her prettiness; but Margaret had never thought about it until the last few days, when the prospect of soon losing her companion seemed to give force to every sweet quality and charm which Edith possessed. They had been talking about wedding-dresses, and wedding ceremonies; and Captain Lennox, and what he had told Edith about her future life at Corfu, where his regiment was stationed; and the ,difficulty of keeping a piano in good tune (a Jdifficulty which Edith seemed to consider as 1one of the most formidable that could befall her in her married life), and what gowns she should want in the visits to Scotland, which would immediately succeed her marriage; but the whispered tone had latterly become more drowsy; and Margaret, after a pause of a few minutes, found, as she fancied, that, in spite of the buzz in the next room, Edith had rolled lierself into a soft ball of muslin and ribbon and silken curls, and gone off into a peaceful little after-dinner nap. Margaret had been on the point of telling her cousin of some of the plans and visions which she entertained as to her future life in the country parsonage, where her father and mother lived; and where her bright holidays had always been passed, though for the last ten years her aunt Shaws house had been considered as her home. But in default of-a lis
(Typographical errors above are due to OCR software and don't occur in the book.)

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