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American Poems: Books: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Annotated)
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 Home » Books » The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Annotated)

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Annotated)

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  • Sales Rank:1,415,615
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Language:English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Pages:346
  • Publication Date:May 22, 2012
  • ASIN:B0085G91QK

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Includes:
-Mark Twain's bio
-Chapter Summaries and analysis

Since its initial publication in the mid-1880s, author Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has remained a perennial favorite of readers young and old. Often included in lists of the greatest American novels ever written, Huckleberry Finn has inspired reams of scholarly analysis in the century since its debut for the many ways, overt and subtle, that Twain both reflected and critiqued the cultural and social mores of the times in which he wrote.

The story of Huckleberry Finn is deceptively simple in its structure, telling of the further escapades of the title character, first introduced by Twain as a secondary protagonist in his 1876 novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (and who would later appear, again in a secondary role, in the sequel novels Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective).

First envisioning his sequel to Tom Sawyer as a mammoth tome entitled Huckleberry Finn’s Autobiography, which would track its lead character from his adolescent, boyhood years all the way up through to his adulthood, Twain picked away at his manuscript for several years before finally abandoning his initial conceit altogether and choosing instead to cast a much more narrowed, specific focus on one specific series of events in the protagonist’s life.

In the end, it was a trip along the Hudson River that put the final brick in place for Twain and ultimately prompted him to complete the long-gestating book. The now-retitled Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (with its new title serving as a nod to the prior novel, and the absence of the definite article indicating the more open-ended nature of Finn’s story) was published internationally in December of 1884, and domestically in the United States in February 1885.

A point of contention among many critics of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn at the time of the book’s release and even today has been its often harsh use of language, especially when referring to African-American characters (specifically the casual use of the word “nigger,” despite the fact that it was an accurate representation of the era’s common parlance). This has invited complaints that the book trafficked in racism, despite the clear evidence in the book itself that its main character is very much the opposite, as was Twain himself.

In the final analysis, what has allowed this work to transcend its time and truly endure is how, more than simply depicting the lifestyles of the era, Twain utilizes his narrative to make some observations – sometimes subtle, sometimes quite scathing – about humanity at its worst, all filtered through the eyes and words of his young protagonist. The use of first-person narration, extensive regional dialects, and vivid descriptions of life along the Mississippi river where much of the story is set only further the verisimilitude of the scenario.
Amazon.com Review
A seminal work of American Literature that still commands deep praise and still elicits controversy, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is essential to the understanding of the American soul. The recent discovery of the first half of Twain's manuscript, long thought lost, made front-page news. And this unprecedented edition, which contains for the first time omitted episodes and other variations present in the first half of the handwritten manuscript, as well as facsimile reproductions of thirty manuscript pages, is indispensable to a full understanding of the novel. The changes, deletions, and additions made in the first half of the manuscript indicate that Mark Twain frequently checked his impulse to write an even darker, more confrontational book than the one he finally published.
Synopsis
Includes:
-Mark Twain's bio
-Chapter Summaries and analysis

Since its initial publication in the mid-1880s, author Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has remained a perennial favorite of readers young and old. Often included in lists of the greatest American novels ever written, Huckleberry Finn has inspired reams of scholarly analysis in the century since its debut for the many ways, overt and subtle, that Twain both reflected and critiqued the cultural and social mores of the times in which he wrote.

The story of Huckleberry Finn is deceptively simple in its structure, telling of the further escapades of the title character, first introduced by Twain as a secondary protagonist in his 1876 novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (and who would later appear, again in a secondary role, in the sequel novels Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective).

First envisioning his sequel to Tom Sawyer as a mammoth tome entitled Huckleberry Finn’s Autobiography, which would track its lead character from his adolescent, boyhood years all the way up through to his adulthood, Twain picked away at his manuscript for several years before finally abandoning his initial conceit altogether and choosing instead to cast a much more narrowed, specific focus on one specific series of events in the protagonist’s life.

In the end, it was a trip along the Hudson River that put the final brick in place for Twain and ultimately prompted him to complete the long-gestating book. The now-retitled Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (with its new title serving as a nod to the prior novel, and the absence of the definite article indicating the more open-ended nature of Finn’s story) was published internationally in December of 1884, and domestically in the United States in February 1885.

A point of contention among many critics of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn at the time of the book’s release and even today has been its often harsh use of language, especially when referring to African-American characters (specifically the casual use of the word “nigger,” despite the fact that it was an accurate representation of the era’s common parlance). This has invited complaints that the book trafficked in racism, despite the clear evidence in the book itself that its main character is very much the opposite, as was Twain himself.

In the final analysis, what has allowed this work to transcend its time and truly endure is how, more than simply depicting the lifestyles of the era, Twain utilizes his narrative to make some observations – sometimes subtle, sometimes quite scathing – about humanity at its worst, all filtered through the eyes and words of his young protagonist. The use of first-person narration, extensive regional dialects, and vivid descriptions of life along the Mississippi river where much of the story is set only further the verisimilitude of the scenario.

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