Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class XML_Parser in /home/sites/www.americanpoems.com/web/store/aom/includes/os.php on line 1188

Strict Standards: Declaration of XML_Parser::raiseError() should be compatible with PEAR::raiseError($message = NULL, $code = NULL, $mode = NULL, $options = NULL, $userinfo = NULL, $error_class = NULL, $skipmsg = false) in /home/sites/www.americanpoems.com/web/store/aom/includes/os.php on line 1604

Strict Standards: Declaration of XML_Unserializer::startHandler() should be compatible with XML_Parser::startHandler($xp, $elem, &$attribs) in /home/sites/www.americanpoems.com/web/store/aom/includes/os.php on line 3503

Strict Standards: Declaration of Cache_Lite_File::get() should be compatible with Cache_Lite::get($id, $group = 'default', $doNotTestCacheValidity = false) in /home/sites/www.americanpoems.com/web/store/aom/includes/cache.php on line 1020
American Poems: Books: The Commitment Engine: Making Work Worth It
Home
Apparel
Appliances
Books
DVD
Electronics
Home & Garden
Kindle eBooks
Magazines
Music
Outdoor Living
Software
Tools & Hardware
PC & Video Games
Location:
 Home » Books » The Commitment Engine: Making Work Worth It

The Commitment Engine: Making Work Worth It

In Stock
Buy
  • Sales Rank:426,984
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Language:English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Pages:254
  • Publication Date:October 11, 2012
  • ASIN:B007X636ZK


Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
The small-business guru behind Duct Tape Marketing and The Referral Engine teaches readers how to establish lasting commitment in their employees, customers, and businesses.

 

Why are some companies able to generate committed, long-term customers while others struggle to stay afloat? Why do the employees of some organizations fully dedicate themselves while others punch the clock without enthusiasm?

 

By studying the ins and outs of companies that enjoy extraordinary loyalty from customers and employees, John Jantsch reveals the systematic path to discovering and generating genuine commitment.

 

Jantsch’s approach is built on three foundational planks, which he calls the clarity path, the culture patron, and the customer promise. He draws on his own experiences and shares true stories from businesses like Threadless, Evernote, and Warby Parker. His strategies include these:


Build your company around a purpose. People commit to companies and stories that have a simple, straightforward purpose.
Understand that culture equals brand. Build your business as a brand that employees and customers will support.
Lead by telling great stories. You can’t attract the right people or get them to commit without telling a story about why you do what you do.
Treat your staff as your customer. A healthy customer community is the natural result of a healthy internal culture.
Serve customers you respect. It’s hard to have an authentic relationship with people you don’t know, like, or trust.

 

As Jantsch says, “Have you ever encountered a business where everything felt effortless? The experience was perfect, and the products, people, and brand worked together gracefully. You made an odd request; it was greeted with a smile. You went to try a new feature; it was right where it should be. You walked in, sat down, and felt right at home. . . . Businesses that run so smoothly as to seem self-managed aren’t normal. In fact, they are terribly counterintuitive, but terribly simple as it turns out.”

 

As a follow-up to The Referral Engine, this is about more than just establishing leads— it’s about building a fully alive business that attracts customers for life.

CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED ‘AS IS’ AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.
Brought to you by American Poems