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American Poems: Books: The House of the Seven Gables (Oxford World's Classics)
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 Home » Books » The House of the Seven Gables (Oxford World's Classics)

The House of the Seven Gables (Oxford World's Classics)

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  • Sales Rank:932,000
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Language:English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Pages:368
  • Publication Date:May 7, 1998
  • ASIN:B006RQ11IG

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
In the final years of the seventeenth century in a small New England town, the
venerable Colonel Pyncheon decides to erect a ponderously oak-framed and spacious
family mansion. It occupies the spot where Matthew Maule, `an obscure man', had
lived in a log hut, until his execution for witchcraft. From the scaffold, Maule
points his finger at the presiding Colonel and cries `God will give him blood to
drink!' The fate of Colonel Pyncheon exerts a heavy influence on his descendants
inthe crumbling mansion for the next century and a half.Hawthorne called his novel a
`Romance', drawing on the Gothic tradition which embraced and exploited the thrills
of the supernatural. Unlike The Scarlet Letter, with its unrelentingly dark view of
human nature and guilt, Hawthorne sought to write `a more natural and healthy
product of my mind', a story which would show guilt to be a trick of the
imagination. The tension between fantasy and a new realism underpins the novel's
descriptive virtuosity.

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