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 Home » Books » The Invisible Man (Tor Classics)

The Invisible Man (Tor Classics)

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  • Sales Rank:1,476,019
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Language:English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Edition:Complete and Unabridged
  • Pages:174
  • Publication Date:April 1, 2010
  • ASIN:B004N635XG

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title—offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of The Invisible Man includes a Foreword, Biographical Note, and Afterword by Gregory Benford.

It began with a quiet country inn--and a mysterious stranger, his features masked by gloves, dark glasses, and bandages that completely covered his head. Then came weird noises, the disembodied ravings, the phantom robberies, the haunted furniture...

The violence...The rampages...The killing.

An obscure scientist named Griffin had found a way to turn skin, flesh, blood and bones invisible--and tried the formula on himself. He could go anywhere; spy; steal; menace anyone. The Invisible Man had only two problems.

He couldn't turn visible again.

And he had gone quite murderously insane.

At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.

Amazon.com Review
We rely, in this world, on the visual aspects of humanity as a means of learning who we are. This, Ralph Ellison argues convincingly, is a dangerous habit. A classic from the moment it first appeared in 1952, Invisible Man chronicles the travels of its narrator, a young, nameless black man, as he moves through the hellish levels of American intolerance and cultural blindness. Searching for a context in which to know himself, he exists in a very peculiar state. "I am an invisible man," he says in his prologue. "When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination--indeed, everything and anything except me." But this is hard-won self-knowledge, earned over the course of many years.

As the book gets started, the narrator is expelled from his Southern Negro college for inadvertently showing a white trustee the reality of black life in the south, including an incestuous farmer and a rural whorehouse. The college director chastises him: "Why, the dumbest black bastard in the cotton patch knows that the only way to please a white man is to tell him a lie! What kind of an education are you getting around here?" Mystified, the narrator moves north to New York City, where the truth, at least as he perceives it, is dealt another blow when he learns that his former headmaster's recommendation letters are, in fact, letters of condemnation.

What ensues is a search for what truth actually is, which proves to be supremely elusive. The narrator becomes a spokesman for a mixed-race band of social activists called "The Brotherhood" and believes he is fighting for equality. Once again, he realizes he's been duped into believing what he thought was the truth, when in fact it is only another variation. Of the Brothers, he eventually discerns: "They were blind, bat blind, moving only by the echoed sounds of their voices. And because they were blind they would destroy themselves.... Here I thought they accepted me because they felt that color made no difference, when in reality it made no difference because they didn't see either color or men."

Invisible Man is certainly a book about race in America, and sadly enough, few of the problems it chronicles have disappeared even now. But Ellison's first novel transcends such a narrow definition. It's also a book about the human race stumbling down the path to identity, challenged and successful to varying degrees. None of us can ever be sure of the truth beyond ourselves, and possibly not even there. The world is a tricky place, and no one knows this better than the invisible man, who leaves us with these chilling, provocative words: "And it is this which frightens me: Who knows but that, on the lower frequencies, I speak for you?" --Melanie Rehak

Synopsis
Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title—offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of The Invisible Man includes a Foreword, Biographical Note, and Afterword by Gregory Benford.

It began with a quiet country inn--and a mysterious stranger, his features masked by gloves, dark glasses, and bandages that completely covered his head. Then came weird noises, the disembodied ravings, the phantom robberies, the haunted furniture...

The violence...The rampages...The killing.

An obscure scientist named Griffin had found a way to turn skin, flesh, blood and bones invisible--and tried the formula on himself. He could go anywhere; spy; steal; menace anyone. The Invisible Man had only two problems.

He couldn't turn visible again.

And he had gone quite murderously insane.

At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.


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