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American Poems: Books: Lady Chatterley's Lover (LAWRENCE Book 1)
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 Home » Books » Lady Chatterley's Lover (LAWRENCE Book 1)

Lady Chatterley's Lover (LAWRENCE Book 1)

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  • Sales Rank:1,296,863
  • Format:Kindle eBook
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Published)
  • Media:Kindle Edition
  • Edition:1
  • Pages:376
  • Publication Date:January 9, 2009
  • ASIN:B001PBEN1U


Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Lord Chatterley comes home to England from the First World War in a wheelchair. Unable to fully function as a man, his new bride is far from satisfied. The maid helps her out by making discreet introductions to the locals. Appearances are important. Every effort is made to maintain the manor in keeping with English tradition. What goes on at night in the village between Lady Chatterley and her lovers is nobody's business. Such things were not topics for discussion in polite society.

D.H. Lawrence suffered greatly over his second novel, Lady Chatterly's Lover, in that established publishers wanted him to change the text in order to show the censors that it was a legitamate literary work rather than the smut-filled pornography that his critics claimed it to be. In the end, it was never copyrighted. Published primarily in small print runs outside his native England, Lawrence benefited only slightly from the profits. It was, and remains, D.H. Lawrence's most controversial work. I choose not to comment further, and leave the reader to his/her own judgment as to the merit of this particular novel.

Fred Dungan (editor, publisher)
Amazon.com Review
Perhaps the most famous of Lawrence's novels, the 1928 Lady Chatterley's Lover is no longer distinguished for the once-shockingly explicit treatment of its subject matter--the adulterous affair between a sexually unfulfilled upper-class married woman and the game keeper who works for the estate owned by her wheelchaired husband. Now that we're used to reading about sex, and seeing it in the movies, it's apparent that the novel is memorable for better reasons: namely, that Lawrence was a masterful and lyrical writer, whose story takes us bodily into the world of its characters.
Synopsis
Lord Chatterley comes home to England from the First World War in a wheelchair. Unable to fully function as a man, his new bride is far from satisfied. The maid helps her out by making discreet introductions to the locals. Appearances are important. Every effort is made to maintain the manor in keeping with English tradition. What goes on at night in the village between Lady Chatterley and her lovers is nobody's business. Such things were not topics for discussion in polite society.

D.H. Lawrence suffered greatly over his second novel, Lady Chatterly's Lover, in that established publishers wanted him to change the text in order to show the censors that it was a legitamate literary work rather than the smut-filled pornography that his critics claimed it to be. In the end, it was never copyrighted. Published primarily in small print runs outside his native England, Lawrence benefited only slightly from the profits. It was, and remains, D.H. Lawrence's most controversial work. I choose not to comment further, and leave the reader to his/her own judgment as to the merit of this particular novel.

Fred Dungan (editor, publisher)

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