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American Poems: Books: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Forgotten Books)
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 Home » Books » The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Forgotten Books)

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Forgotten Books)

  • List Price: $7.62
  • Buy New: $6.76
  • as of 9/19/2014 23:20 EDT details
  • You Save: $0.86 (11%)
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New (3) Used (2) from $6.76
  • Seller:JnJStore
  • Sales Rank:6,638,264
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Pages:136
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.5
  • Dimensions (in):8.8 x 6 x 0.6
  • Publication Date:October 16, 2008
  • ISBN:1606802216
  • EAN:9781606802212
  • ASIN:1606802216
Availability:Usually ships in 1-2 business days

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a children's novel written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. It was originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Chicago in 1900, and has since been reprinted countless times, sometimes under the name The Wizard of Oz. The story chronicles the adventures of a girl named Dorothy in the Land of Oz. It is one of the best-known stories in American popular culture and has been widely translated. Its initial success, and the success of the popular 1903 Broadway musical Baum adapted from his story, led to Baum's writing and having published thirteen more Oz books.

Baum dedicated the book "to my good friend & comrade, My Wife," Maud Gage Baum. In January 1901 the publisher, the George M. Hill Company, completed printing the first edition, which probably totaled around 35,000 copies. Records indicate that 21,000 copies were sold through 1900.

The original book has been in public domain in the United States since 1956. Baum's thirteen sequels entered public domain in the United States from 1960 through 1986. The rights to these books were held by the Walt Disney Company, and their impending expiration was a prime motivator for the production of the 1985 film Return to Oz, based on Baum's second and third Oz books. (Quote from wikipedia.org)

About the Author

Lyman Frank Baum (1856 - 1919)
Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 - May 6, 1919) was an American author, actor, and independent filmmaker best known as the creator, along with illustrator W. W. Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children's literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works (55 novels in total, 82
Amazon.com Review
For many of us, the adventures of Dorothy in Oz will forever be associated not with Judy Garland singing "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" but with W. W. Denslow's exceedingly odd line drawings for the original editions of Baum's Oz series. The Viennese artist Lisbeth Zwerger, however, goes a long way toward providing a new and refreshed set of images for the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion, and the humbug wizard. These illustrations are often cockeyed, with occasional realistic details thrown in, like a crow with a corncob in its beak in the first portrait of the Scarecrow. The characters have a poignance and oddity that escaped the makers of the Oz movie.

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