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American Poems: Books: The Book of Tea
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The Book of Tea

The Book of Tea
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  • List Price: $5.49
  • Buy New: $5.39
  • as of 12/20/2014 02:17 EST details
  • You Save: $0.10 (2%)
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New (19) Used (20) from $1.00
  • Seller:JnJStore
  • Sales Rank:1,442,461
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Number Of Items:1
  • Pages:84
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.2
  • Dimensions (in):5 x 0.2 x 8
  • Publication Date:April 9, 2009
  • ISBN:1604596430
  • EAN:9781604596434
  • ASIN:1604596430
Availability:Usually ships in 2-3 business days

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  • Used Book in Good Condition

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
"The Book of Tea by Okakura Kakuzo shows how Tea has affected nearly every aspect of Japanese culture, thought, and life. The book is accessible to Western audiences because, though Kakuzo was born and raised Japanese, he was trained from a young age to speak English. In this book he explains tea in the context of Zen and Taoism as well as the secular aspects of Tea and Japanese life. This book emphasizes how Teaism taught the Japanese many things; most importantly, simplicity. Kakuzo argues that this tea-induced simplicity affected Japanese art and architecture. A clear guide to living a simple and fulfilling life."
Amazon.com Review
That a nation should construct one of its most resonant national ceremonies round a cup of tea will surely strike a chord of sympathy with at least some readers of this review. To many foreigners, nothing is so quintessentially Japanese as the tea ceremony--more properly, "the way of tea"--with its austerity, its extravagantly minimalist stylization, and its concentration of extreme subtleties of meaning into the simplest of actions. The Book of Tea is something of a curiosity: written in English by a Japanese scholar (and issued here in bilingual form), it was first published in 1906, in the wake of the naval victory over Russia with which Japan asserted its rapidly acquired status as a world-class military power. It was a peak moment of Westernization within Japan. Clearly, behind the publication was an agenda, or at least a mission to explain. Around its account of the ceremony, The Book of Tea folds an explication of the philosophy, first Taoist, later Zen Buddhist, that informs its oblique celebration of simplicity and directness--what Okakura calls, in a telling phrase, "moral geometry." And the ceremony itself? Its greatest practitioners have always been philosophers, but also artists, connoisseurs, collectors, gardeners, calligraphers, gourmets, flower arrangers. The greatest of them, Sen Rikyu, left a teasingly, maddeningly simple set of rules:
Make a delicious bowl of tea; lay the charcoal so that it heats the water; arrange the flowers as they are in the field; in summer suggest coolness; in winter, warmth; do everything ahead of time; prepare for rain; and give those with whom you find yourself every consideration.
A disciple remarked that this seemed elementary. Rikyu replied, "Then if you can host a tea gathering without deviating from any of the rules I have just stated, I will become your disciple." A Zen reply. Fascinating. --Robin Davidson, Amazon.co.uk

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