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American Poems: Books: Death of a Salesman (L.A. Theatre Works Audio Theatre Collections)
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Death of a Salesman (L.A. Theatre Works Audio Theatre Collections)

  • List Price: $29.95
  • Buy New: $20.68
  • as of 8/30/2014 14:57 EDT details
  • You Save: $9.27 (31%)
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New (16) Used (7) from $19.88
  • Seller:-Daily Deals-
  • Sales Rank:551,151
  • Format:Audiobook, Unabridged
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Audio CD
  • Number Of Items:2
  • Pages:2
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.5
  • Dimensions (in):7.5 x 5.3 x 0.9
  • Publication Date:August 15, 2011
  • ISBN:1580818307
  • EAN:9781580818308
  • ASIN:1580818307
Availability:Usually ships in 1-2 business days

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  • Used Book in Good Condition

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Stacy Keach and Jane Kaczmarek star in this 1949 masterpiece by Arthur Miller, a searing portrait of the physical, emotional, and psychological costs of the American dream. Willy Loman (Keach) is the play's iconic traveling salesman, whose family is torn apart by his desperate obsession with greatness and social acceptance. As his two sons cast about aimlessly for their station in life, Willy begins to come unraveled when the reality of his life threatens his long-cherished illusions.

An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring:
Stacy Keach as Willy Loman;
and Jane Kaczmarek as Linda Loman;
Steven Culp as Biff Loman;
Maureen Flannigan as Letta and Jenny;
Jason Henning as Bernard and Stanley;
Kathryn Meisle as The Woman;
Tim Monsion as Uncle Ben;
Sam Mcmurray as Charley;
John Sloan as Happy Loman;
Kate Steele as Miss Forsythe;
Kenneth Alan Williams as Howard.

Directed by Eric Simonson. Recorded before a live audience at the Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles in March, 2011.
Amazon.com Review
Arthur Miller's 1949 Death of a Salesman has sold 11 million copies, and Willy Loman didn't make all those sales on a smile and a shoeshine. This play is the genuine article--it's got the goods on the human condition, all packed into a day in the life of one self-deluded, self-promoting, self-defeating soul. It's a sturdy bridge between kitchen-sink realism and spectral abstraction, the facts of particular hard times and universal themes. As Christopher Bigsby's mildly interesting afterword in this 50th-anniversary edition points out (as does Miller in his memoir, Timebends), Willy is closely based on the playwright's sad, absurd salesman uncle, Manny. But of course Miller made Manny into Everyman, and gave him the name of the crime commissioner Lohmann in Fritz Lang's angst-ridden 1932 Nazi parable, The Testament of Dr. Mabuse.

The tragedy of Loman the all-American dreamer and loser works eternally, on the page as on the stage. A lot of plays made history around 1949, but none have stepped out of history into the classic canon as Salesman has. Great as it was, Tennessee Williams's work can't be revived as vividly as this play still is, all over the world. (This edition has edifying pictures of Lee J. Cobb's 1949 and Brian Dennehy's 1999 performances.) It connects Aristotle, The Great Gatsby, On the Waterfront, David Mamet, and the archetypal American movie antihero. It even transcends its author's tragic flaw of pious preachiness (which undoes his snoozy The Crucible, unfortunately his most-produced play).

No doubt you've seen Willy Loman's story at least once. It's still worth reading. --Tim Appelo


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