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American Poems: Books: The monster and other stories
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The monster and other stories

The monster and other stories
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  • List Price: $3.96
  • Buy New: $3.40
  • as of 4/16/2014 19:19 EDT details
  • You Save: $0.56 (14%)
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New (6) Used (1) from $3.40
  • Seller:pbshopus
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Paperback
  • Number Of Items:1
  • Pages:36
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.2
  • Dimensions (in):9.7 x 7.4 x 0.1
  • Publication Date:September 12, 2013
  • ISBN:1230351817
  • EAN:9781230351810
  • ASIN:1230351817
Availability:Usually ships in 1-2 business days

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1899 edition. Excerpt: ... did not hear the doctor's buggy drive up to the stable. Trescott got out, tied his horse, and approached the group. Jimmie saw him first, and at his look of dismay the others wheeled. "What's all this, Jimmic?" asked Trescott, in surprise. The lad advanced to the front of his companions, halted, and said nothing. Trescott's face gloomed slightly as he scanned the scene. "What were you doing, Jimmie?" "We was playin'," answered Jimmie, huskily. "Playing at what?" "Just playin'." Trescott looked gravely at the other boys, and asked them to please go home. They proceeded to the street much in the manner of frustrated and revealed assassins. The crime of trespass on another boy's place was still a crime when they had only accepted the other boy's cordial invitation, and they were used to being sent out of all manner of gardens upon the sudden appearance of a father or a mother. Jimmie had wretchedly watched the departure of his companions. It involved the loss of his position as a lad who controlled the privileges of his father's grounds, but then he knew that in the beginning he had no right to ask so many boys to be his guests. Once on the sidewalk, however, they speedily forgot their shame as trespassers, and the large boy launched forth in a description of his success in the late trial of courage. As they went rapidly up the street, the little boy who had made the furtive expedition cried out confidently from the rear, "Yes, and I went almost up to him, didn't I, Willie?" The large boy crushed him in a few words. "Huh!" he scoffed. "You only went a little way. I went clear up to him." The pace of the other boys was so manly that the tiny thing had to trot,...

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