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American Poems: Books: Things are Happening (APR Honickman 1st Book Prize)
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Things are Happening (APR Honickman 1st Book Prize)

  • List Price: $23.00
  • Buy New: $18.58
  • as of 4/22/2014 17:56 EDT details
  • You Save: $4.42 (19%)
In Stock
  • Seller:allnewbooks
  • Sales Rank:2,781,410
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Hardcover
  • Number Of Items:1
  • Edition:1st
  • Pages:96
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.7
  • Dimensions (in):9.3 x 6.3 x 0.6
  • Publication Date:September 1, 1998
  • ISBN:0966339509
  • EAN:9780966339505
  • ASIN:0966339509
Availability:Usually ships in 1-2 business days

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
The inaugural winner of the annual American Poetry Review/Honickman First Book Award.
Amazon.com Review
Joshua Beckman, winner of the APR/Honickman First Book Prize, is one of those poets whose work you mustn't miss. His talent shines in his ability to make disparate events become part of a whole. "Purple Heart Highway" constructs loss as imminent danger ("where a train might mistakenly come") or as the pendulum between routine and chaos ("a gray grinning calmness / from which you can get nothing to wake") or as a sudden realization that threads far back into one's past ("I woke up to a plate full of no options / echoing through the cupped ear of my life / spinning the wheels that wouldn't, / for anything, take me away").

In "Winter's Horizon" the theme of loss seeks--and finds--its own sensibilities. A boy writes a story about a father who rides off into the sunset on his riding lawnmower. The boy feels his story is full of meaning, his mother hates it, and his teacher gives it an A+. Yet the lines between fiction and fact, between father and son, and between desire and loss are only the thinnest membranes: "like an engine / steadily moving away / until it is a thin line / of reverberation / ...and its being gone / gives you a terrible sense / a terrible sense of completeness / a terrible sense that things like this / will continue to happen." --Susan Swartwout


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