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American Poems: Books: Emma (Bantam Classics)
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 Home » Books » Emma (Bantam Classics)

Emma (Bantam Classics)

  • List Price: $4.95
  • Buy New: $1.25
  • as of 7/26/2014 03:49 EDT details
  • You Save: $3.70 (75%)
In Stock
  • Seller:underlandbooks
  • Sales Rank:442,101
  • Languages:English (Unknown), English (Original Language), English (Published)
  • Media:Mass Market Paperback
  • Number Of Items:1
  • Pages:432
  • Shipping Weight (lbs):0.5
  • Dimensions (in):6.9 x 4.3 x 1
  • Publication Date:February 1, 1984
  • ISBN:0553212737
  • EAN:9780553212730
  • ASIN:0553212737
Availability:Usually ships in 1-2 business days

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Editorial Reviews:
Synopsis
Emma, first published in 1816, was written when Jane Austen was at the height of her powers. In a novel remarkable for its sparkling wit and modernity, Austen presents readers with two of literature‚Äôs greatest comic creations‚ÄĒthe eccentric Mr. Woodhouse and that quintessential bore, Miss Bates. Here, too, we have what may well be Jane Austen‚Äôs most profound characterization: the witty, imaginative, self-deluded Emma, a heroine the author declared ‚Äúno one but myself will much like,‚ÄĚ but who has been much loved by generations of readers. Delightfully funny, full of rich irony, Emma is regarded as one of Jane Austen‚Äôs finest achievements.
Amazon.com Review
Of all Jane Austen's heroines, Emma Woodhouse is the most flawed, the most infuriating, and, in the end, the most endearing. Pride and Prejudice's Lizzie Bennet has more wit and sparkle; Catherine Morland in Northanger Abbey more imagination; and Sense and Sensibility's Elinor Dashwood certainly more sense--but Emma is lovable precisely because she is so imperfect. Austen only completed six novels in her lifetime, of which five feature young women whose chances for making a good marriage depend greatly on financial issues, and whose prospects if they fail are rather grim. Emma is the exception: "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her." One may be tempted to wonder what Austen could possibly find to say about so fortunate a character. The answer is, quite a lot.

For Emma, raised to think well of herself, has such a high opinion of her own worth that it blinds her to the opinions of others. The story revolves around a comedy of errors: Emma befriends Harriet Smith, a young woman of unknown parentage, and attempts to remake her in her own image. Ignoring the gaping difference in their respective fortunes and stations in life, Emma convinces herself and her friend that Harriet should look as high as Emma herself might for a husband--and she zeroes in on an ambitious vicar as the perfect match. At the same time, she reads too much into a flirtation with Frank Churchill, the newly arrived son of family friends, and thoughtlessly starts a rumor about poor but beautiful Jane Fairfax, the beloved niece of two genteelly impoverished elderly ladies in the village. As Emma's fantastically misguided schemes threaten to surge out of control, the voice of reason is provided by Mr. Knightly, the Woodhouse's longtime friend and neighbor. Though Austen herself described Emma as "a heroine whom no one but myself will much like," she endowed her creation with enough charm to see her through her most egregious behavior, and the saving grace of being able to learn from her mistakes. By the end of the novel Harriet, Frank, and Jane are all properly accounted for, Emma is wiser (though certainly not sadder), and the reader has had the satisfaction of enjoying Jane Austen at the height of her powers. --Alix Wilber


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