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Analysis and comments on This Is Just To Say by William Carlos Williams

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Comment 51 of 231, added on February 15th, 2006 at 9:19 PM.

50 posts and only once is the idea of "forbidden fruit" invoked. This
suprises me, as it seems pretty obvious.

What made the plums so delicious? I have eaten plums, and while they can be
tasty, i have never felt compelled to share my plum experiances with the
world. Could the fact that these plums were being saved for some other
purpose have fueled Williams' enjoyment of them? Eating plums is one
experiance, but eating forbidden fruit is something different.



dohr from United States
Comment 50 of 231, added on January 28th, 2006 at 3:30 PM.

This poem does have a certain beauty in its simplicity, but if it is
intended as a metaphor for the loss of virginity it is less than
successful. The speaker has initiated action independently, and clearly
without the consent of the plums' owner. Therefore, if the poem is about
the loss of virginity, it is about a rape. However, the first stanza is a
simple declaration - and if the poem is an apology for a rape, there would
be no need to inform the woman that she had been raped.
The outside reader, of course, would need to know, but the same
information could be conveyed much more artfully by the omission of much of
the first stanza, leaving something like this:

You were probably
saving your
plums in the icebox
for breakfast

Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet, and
so cold

No, there is no metaphor of lost virginity in the poem. It is, as mentioned
in previous posts, the transformation of a simple, everyday event into a
simple poem, whose beauty comes from its very simplicity.
My only critique of the poem, as such, comes from the facile nature of
such writing. A rectangle is beautiful in its simplicity, but it takes no
great skill to draw one - simple poems are much the same.

This is Just to Say

I have been
searching
through your poem
for meaning

but I
have been unable
to find it

Forgive me, William
if I think
your poem
senseless


Patrick from United States
Comment 49 of 231, added on January 10th, 2006 at 7:35 PM.

I love this poem. This it the poem that really started me on poetry.
I think its about rape, or someone stealing someone else virginity, while,
yes, he feels remorse. He still craves more.

Rachel from United States
Comment 48 of 231, added on December 13th, 2005 at 5:20 PM.

This is a really good poem. It has a really sad and depressed side to it,
but it is fun. No one better email me just because I am THE Gerard Way of
My Chemical Romance!!!!!

Gerard Way from United States
Comment 47 of 231, added on December 6th, 2005 at 11:19 PM.

You know what this poem is simple it's just him confessing about a mistake
it's nothing a dumbass couldnt see.He expresses himself with simple words
thats why i love this poet so much(not that way).And having that said i
think this has got to be the best peom he wrote.

mitchell from Canada
Comment 46 of 231, added on December 5th, 2005 at 1:13 PM.

totally love it! what a man ....making a poem out of a note he probably
left on his fridge for his wife! hard to say whether he really thought
about how it could be interpreted...but all the same... what a poem!

Lauz from United Kingdom
Comment 45 of 231, added on December 4th, 2005 at 2:28 PM.

i don't understand why you all feel the need to make it into a love story.
why can't it just be a guy apoligizing? i don't take like he's actually
sorry for eating the plums he's just apoligizing in a sing-song kind of
voice because it's better than not apoligizing at all.

Jen from United States
Comment 44 of 231, added on December 1st, 2005 at 2:36 PM.

i think this poem is to show that he is sorry for what he has done. because
what he had done was not right. so he is apologizing to someone he hurted.!

pheng from United States
Comment 43 of 231, added on November 27th, 2005 at 10:17 AM.

everyone who says this poem sucks is just showing how sorry they are for
themselves for not being able to express how they feel using simple words
and have it come out so beautiful.

having said that, I love this poem.

Tiban from Mexico
Comment 42 of 231, added on November 15th, 2005 at 7:01 PM.

I think the poem is based on Fruedian theory. The plums which were being
saved for breakfast are really a womens virginity (she was saving it for
marrage). He apologizes for taking her virginity by asking for forgiveness.
It was "so sweet and so cold" because as a virgin it felt so good to him
but at the same time so cold because he took something she was saving. Her
virginity was something only one man could have.

Vivianna from United States

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Information about This Is Just To Say

Poet: William Carlos Williams
Poem: This Is Just To Say
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 4747 times
Poem of the Day: Nov 22 2008


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