Children picking up our bones
Will never know that these were once
As quick as foxes on the hill;

And that in autumn, when the grapes
Made sharp air sharper by their smell
These had a being, breathing frost;

And least will guess that with our bones
We left much more, left what still is
The look of things, left what we felt

At what we saw. The spring clouds blow
Above the shuttered mansion-house,
Beyond our gate and the windy sky

Cries out a literate despair.
We knew for long the mansion’s look
And what we said of it became

A part of what it is . . . Children,
Still weaving budded aureoles,
Will speak our speech and never know,

Will say of the mansion that it seems
As if he that lived there left behind
A spirit storming in blank walls,

A dirty house in a gutted world,
A tatter of shadows peaked to white,
Smeared with the gold of the opulent sun.

Analysis, meaning and summary of Wallace Stevens's poem A Postcard From The Volcano

2 Comments

  1. mark says:

    A lamentation of the fleeting nature of life and human memory. A simple poem, but one possessing a beautiful sadness that I find myself returning to often.

  2. Jocelyne Do Carmo De Lima Viegas says:

    “A Postcard from the Volcano” offers its readers a few simple words delivered after the apocalypse; but the language survives from a past that is only apparently destroyed, and the historical continuities of the language that forms the poem itself undermine the poem’s evocative sense of an ending. Stevens begins by recognizing a new generation’s inevitable sense of its distance from its heritage. Yet he speaks with the voice of the dead.
    The dominant feeling of the poem, then, that of the living present of the poet’s immediate thinking, may be summed up in the phrase, “The gaiety of language.” The poet shares the despair, the aching desolation, of his bodily self but, as experienced by this man as poet, the despair become “a literate despair” that cries out in all three presents, but mainly in the supratemporal present, as above and “Beyond our gate and the windy sky.” From that other ether, the poet experiences the jubilance of knowing the intricate relationships between past and present and future within the time series. As a result of such knowing, the whole of the world of the poem, the dirty mansion, the children, the bones left behind, the way things are seen and felt, and speech itself are all “Smeared with the gold of the opulent sun,” with that supratemporal source of light and awareness that is the very moving of the poet’s thought in the present of his poem as living, imaginative experience. The despair of what will become mere bones to be picked up by children, the guilty innocence of the children, these remain the anguish and the ignorance of this desolate world. While the words continue to tremble and echo from the volcano, however, while this supratemporal linguistic awareness continues to smear the dirt and poverty of the scene with the gold of its opulence, the despair felt cries out as “a literate despair” and “The gaiety of language is our seignior.” The gold is merely smeared on the dirt; the dirt remains what it is, covered with the gold, but as real as if exposed. Despair, guilt, ignorant wonder, jubilance and gaiety, all survive and contribute vitally to this richly historical and desolately unhistorical affirmation of an imaginative truth.

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