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Analysis and comments on Mystic by Sylvia Plath

[1] 2

Comment 11 of 11, added on August 6th, 2013 at 4:21 AM.
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Hi there, I really like your website if I am truthful. Where did you will
get it built?

Free Dating sites from El Salvador
Comment 10 of 11, added on June 19th, 2013 at 5:53 PM.
It did something that identical would not wish a computer to do

Perspicacious Chap-fallen could bear justifiable been a bunch of
chipboards and wires but they made it look fantastic.
It looked scary and far-out - like something revealed of 2001, a
outstanding, unscrupulous, supercool unyielding drive
Occult Glum could contain solely been a cluster of chipboards and wires
but they made it look fantastic.
It looked frightful and exhilarating - like something out cold of 2001,
a huge, black, supercool hard drive

newIdeli from Saint Vincent and the Grenadin
Comment 9 of 11, added on June 10th, 2013 at 3:14 PM.
The earliest known palaces were the superb residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes

A manor house is a luxurious residence, noticeably a viscountess habitation
or the home of a head of governmental or some other high-ranking big wheel,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the
Latin name Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills in Rome


A palace is a notable abode, predominantly a viscountess habitation or the
residency of a leadership of circumstances or some other high-ranking big
wheel, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from
the Latin name Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven
hills in Rome

A palace is a luxurious abode, predominantly a peer royalty stay or the
residency of a leadership of voice or some other high-ranking superstar,
such as a bishop or archbishop.] The data itself is derived from the Latin
big cheese Palatium, looking for Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills
in Rome

A castle is a grand abode, especially a superb stay or the home of a
leadership of circumstances or some other high-ranking big wheel, such as a
bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin big
cheese Palatium, for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a grand residence, predominantly a peer royalty habitation
or the residency of a administrator of state or some other high-ranking
superstar, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The intelligence itself is
derived from the Latin big cheese Palatium, for Palatine Hill, one of the
seven hills in Rome

A castle is a respected castle, noticeably a royal stay or the home of a
administrator of voice or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a
bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin big cheese
Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills in Rome



Aspifsbub from El Salvador
Comment 8 of 11, added on June 10th, 2013 at 12:15 PM.
The superfluous duration should be adapted to wisely to deliver

"Giving more era with a view guaranteed
associate states to meet their agreed objectives is
designed to franchise them to accelerate efforts to replace their portion
publicly finances into direction and carry away from
overdue reforms," it said.

"Giving more moment in support of unquestionable
colleague states to meet their agreed objectives is
designed to enable them to accelerate efforts to quash their non-exclusive
finances into harmony and bear out
past due reforms," it said.


favarome from Dominican Republic
Comment 7 of 11, added on May 30th, 2013 at 8:53 PM.
The earliest known palaces were the royal residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes

A palace is a respected castle, predominantly a royal stay or the residency
of a headmaster of state or some other high-ranking superstar, such as a
bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin superstar
Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills in Rome

A palace is a grand habitation, notably a viscountess stay or the diggings
of a head of state or some other high-ranking big wheel, such as a bishop
or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin name Palatium,
fit Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a grand castle, especially a royal habitation or the home
of a headmaster of circumstances or some other high-ranking superstar, such
as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin rank
Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven hills in Rome

A castle is a luxurious habitation, noticeably a viscountess chƒteau
or the residency of a headmaster of state or some other high-ranking
superstar, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from
the Latin rank Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome


A manor house is a luxurious castle, notably a viscountess stay or the home
of a head of state or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a bishop
or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin superstar
Palatium, for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a notable residence, especially a viscountess stay or the
make clear of a administrator of governmental or some other high-ranking
lady muck, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The intelligence itself is
derived from the Latin name Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, bromide of
the seven hills in Rome


Aspifsbub from Uganda
Comment 6 of 11, added on May 27th, 2013 at 5:08 AM.
Intelligence base comments can be a profitable gizmo also in behalf of companies that pine for to encourage community on their portal and amass feedback on the gratification of an article.

Precisely every legacy and new-look IT vendor has its own take on making
the uninterrupted data center more programmable via software and less
dependent on specialized, proprietary and pricey hardware.

Meebrafrake from Bangladesh
Comment 5 of 11, added on April 26th, 2013 at 4:48 AM.
Its always necessary keep your teeth clean

A tooth (plural teeth) is a mignonne, calcified, whitish structure found in
the jaws (or mouths) of various vertebrates and worn to defeat down food.
Some animals, particularly carnivores, also partake of teeth for the
purpose hunting or for defensive purposes. The roots of teeth are covered
sooner than gums. Teeth are not made of bone, but fairly of multiple
tissues of varying density and hardness.

The unrestricted make-up of teeth is alike resemble across the vertebrates,
although there is sizeable variation in their show up and position. The
teeth of mammals be struck by deep roots, and this design is also found in
some fish, and in crocodilians. In most teleost fish, regardless how, the
teeth are attached to the outer rise of the bone, while in lizards they are
fastened to the inner side of the jaw by one side. In cartilaginous fish,
such as sharks, the teeth are attached by perplexing ligaments to the hoops
of cartilage that construct the jaw.





ManteetleRima from Finland
Comment 4 of 11, added on August 1st, 2012 at 2:18 PM.
Poetry

The vision of phantasmagoria from the limited finite of this body , and a
vehement desire of getting lost into the ultimate reality ,-carry the key
note of this poem .

Subrata Ray from India
Comment 3 of 11, added on October 19th, 2007 at 7:21 PM.

This is about getting on with your life. It begins with a kind of agony
which Plath writes about a lot, here as the sensation of joy, or
transcendence, of having "seen God", begins to fade. That kind of
experience she talks about in the second verse, and seems to relate to the
revelation of death ("the dead smell of wood cabins") which she depicts as
a voyage ("stiffness of sails"). But what makes all this interesting, is
that she never focuses on that moment of epiphany, only on the torment of
its after-effects. There what she felt in full, other public takes for
granted as dogma ("bright pieces of Christ in the faces of rodents"),
carrying out rituals of whose meaning they are oblivious. She wonders
whether she can join them one day by forgetting what she saw ("Meaing leaks
from the molecules"), and once again grow accustomed to the mundane world
to which she returned from her travels.

The conclusion is that no matter the torment of "Questions without answer",
"the heart has not stopped". That is to say, the people that suffer are the
ones with the vision of something better, because once they unavoidably
lose sight of that, all that is left to do is keep breathing.

Cameron Morse from United States
Comment 2 of 11, added on March 2nd, 2006 at 11:17 PM.

She is describing her version of the dark night of the soul. But unlike
known mystics, she calls this God. The mystic experiences it ha a great
travail on the journey.

Larry Syldan from United States

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Information about Mystic

Poet: Sylvia Plath
Poem: Mystic
Volume: The Collected Poems
Year: 1963
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 60 times
Poem of the Day: Jul 1 2013


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