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Analysis and comments on I saw a man pursuing the horizon by Stephen Crane

1 2 [3]

Comment 8 of 28, added on August 8th, 2005 at 11:45 AM.

The Pursuer has the stubborness and ignorence of a child. How old do you
have to be to be a man?

Minka from United States
Comment 7 of 28, added on July 3rd, 2005 at 10:59 PM.

Thank you Jono for being the voice of Reason.

Patrick from United States
Comment 6 of 28, added on April 20th, 2005 at 8:42 AM.

umm, no one is wrong, we all see the poem different ways, so none of us are
dumbasses. I think that it means that humans have mind sets. The man that
wants to go to the horizon thinks that he can, and he wants to. The other
man sees and trys to tell him that it will not work, but since the man
seeking the horizon is so set in his ways he calls the other guy a liar.we
all have our own mind-sets about certian things like the lock-ness monster
or big-foot or aliens, and this guy had one about the horizon. there are
always people that will come against us in life, but you need to determine
youself if what you are doing is wrong or justified.......thats what i got.

Elizabeth from United States
Comment 5 of 28, added on March 5th, 2005 at 10:59 PM.

I think that you are all wrong. Or dumbasses, if you will...I think that
this poem is about mankind...the man is in pursuit of a goal that is
impossible to achieve, and then, when the voice of reason stops him and
tells him of the hopelessness of his task, the man keeps running anyway.
He prefers ignorance, and calls Reason a liar.

Jono from United States
Comment 4 of 28, added on February 27th, 2005 at 10:07 AM.

This poem is about seeking. It means that we all must find our own answers
in life, and those answers can only be found within ourselves. To look for
external solutions to internal problems is like chasing the horizon--for
every step towards it, the horizon takes a step back from us. The
individual in the poem knows this, and wants to explain it to the second
individual, but the second individual is unable to see it because he too
must walk his own path.

Abraxas from United States
Comment 3 of 28, added on February 26th, 2005 at 11:05 PM.

Hey dumbass, the revolutionary war was in 1776....stephen crane was born
1871.

Dan
Comment 2 of 28, added on January 26th, 2005 at 1:01 AM.

this was written around the revolutionary war it represents the veiws of
the differnt parties

Zane from United States
Comment 1 of 28, added on January 10th, 2005 at 3:37 AM.

How we perceive the world determines our actions. Crane was so succinct! He
offers us opposite perspectives, balancing them perfectly.


Tessa Kallinicos from United States

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
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Information about I saw a man pursuing the horizon

Poet: Stephen Crane
Poem: 24. I saw a man pursuing the horizon
Volume: The Black Riders & Other Lines
Year: 1905
Added: Jan 31 2004
Viewed: 37171 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 25 2000


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