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Analysis and comments on Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind by Stephen Crane

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Comment 20 of 230, added on February 27th, 2006 at 8:55 AM.

This is not sarcasm. That is such a negative term to apply to Stephen
Crane's brilliant sense of paradox and irony. Paradox ... that something
appears to be one thing and is in reality quite another. 'War is Kind'
underscores the illusion maintained by men who believe in war, makes plain
the (non)exellence of killing, the (non) virtue of slaughter, the
unexplained (non) glory. It tells of the universal suffering, of the
maiden, the soldier, the babe, the mother. War 'kindly' dispells the
illusion of glory or virtue. In other words, the horror of war is the only
thing in the end that will teach us the falseness of our belief that war
can ever be right or bring glory or solve anything. This is a spirtual
poem. Look at the spiritual language ... the 'little' souls who thirst for
fight, the Battle-God and his Kingdom, which can only be a graveyard where
a thousand corpses lie, and that only in that false kingdom is there virtue
in killing. Stephen is telling us that men have made war a false god, and
that in the end, it is war alone that 'kindly' teaches us the higher truth.

wendy from United States
Comment 19 of 230, added on February 23rd, 2006 at 2:14 AM.

In response to other comments, I think "ironic" is a better word to use
than "sarcastic". What I love about the poem is the power and emotion he
evokes without talking about emotion at all. It is poignant without being
overly sentimental.

Nathaniel H. from United States
Comment 18 of 230, added on February 15th, 2006 at 7:18 PM.

I think that this work is amazing. Since I read this is wondered how a man
could fit so much emotion into so few words. I was also taken aback by the
fact that he was only what? 28? , when he wrote this poem. I'm sixteen and
I wonder if in 12 years I will be able to fit the emotions of the moment
into 5 or 6 stanzas. The truth is, this poem is a great example of how
irony affects a reader, and how to use irony to get your point across. I
envy this man for all of his talent.

Kat from United States
Comment 17 of 230, added on January 19th, 2006 at 7:55 PM.

This poem is not showing the futility of war or anything like that. i think
it's actualy written as a comfortor to the women who have lost someone dear
to them and telling them in very colorfull language that war is the kind
hand that took their loved on from a sort of hell on earth.

Sanchez from United States
Comment 16 of 230, added on December 5th, 2005 at 5:28 PM.

This is props to Szilard. I'd like to remind people who come here to read
poems and comment on them that the biggest mistake in analyzing poetry is
forcing your own opinion into a poem where it doesn't apply. War is Kind
definitely evokes contrast and irony between the title and the reality of
war. There is not, however, a negative attitude towards soldiers
themselves. Crane actually respects the soldiers and does them honorable
tribute with his words, in some ways harsh and realistic and in others
quite romantic and nobly patriotic. So rather than force your
square-peg-in-round-hole theory onto great poetic works, read it. And learn
to spell.

Spiffy from United States
Comment 15 of 230, added on December 3rd, 2005 at 4:46 PM.

this novel is really interesting. Crane uses a lot of sarcasm and
repetition in this poem. He surely does not agree that ''war is kind,'' he
just says to be sarcastic. He thinks that soldiers go out to war inorder to
get their fame and pride, however, they end up loosing their lives. War is
a battle not only between your opponents, but also between the pesron and
his thoughts. This is because a person will have a struggle within himself,
wheather he should fight or run away from the battle. We see this
throughout our main character, the young boy who tries to overcome his
thoughts on runnig away from the battlefield. Eventually he does get to
abtain this negetive feeling and fights so bravely. Not only that, but at
the end he ends up known by his comrades as a ''war devil.''

josh from Portugal
Comment 14 of 230, added on October 24th, 2005 at 7:53 PM.

I am reading this for a sophomore class in high school. After reading
everyone's thoughts it helped me understand what was really being said.
Crane apposed of war and was not for it at all. He shows this through his
detais in the deaths of the soldiers.
Thanks to all of you for helping me out with my homework.


Amber from United States
Comment 13 of 230, added on September 22nd, 2005 at 3:44 PM.

this novel is really interesting. Crane uses a lot of sarcasm and
repetition in this poem. He surely does not agree that ''war is kind,'' he
just says to be sarcastic. He thinks that soldiers go out to war inorder
to get their fame and pride, however, they end up loosing their lives. War
is a battle not only between your opponents, but also between the pesron
and his thoughts. This is because a person will have a struggle within
himself, wheather he should fight or run away from the battle. We see this
throughout our main character, the young boy who tries to overcome his
thoughts on runnig away from the battlefield. Eventually he does get to
abtain this negetive feeling and fights so bravely. Not only that, but at
the end he ends up known by his comrades as a ''war devil.''

Katrina from United States
Comment 12 of 230, added on September 22nd, 2005 at 3:44 PM.

this novel is really interesting. Crane uses a lot of sarcasm and
repetition in this poem. He surely does not agree that ''war is kind,'' he
just says to be sarcastic. He thinks that soldiers go out to war inorder
to get their fame and pride, however, they end up loosing their lives. War
is a battle not only between your opponents, but also between the pesron
and his thoughts. This is because a person will have a struggle within
himself, wheather he should fight or run away from the battle. We see this
throughout our main character, the young boy who tries to overcome his
thoughts on runnig away from the battlefield. Eventually he does get to
abtain this negetive feeling and fights so bravely. Not only that, but at
the end he ends up known by his comrades as a ''war devil.''

katie burns from United States
Comment 11 of 230, added on September 9th, 2005 at 5:10 PM.

This is a criticism in reply to looolooo's post above.
Injustice is a horrible thing, and war an almost necessary but evil remedy.
War is a horrible thing, injustice is maybe an even more horrible thing,
and there should be ways to stop injustice without resorting to war. It's
the only way to stop war.
Life, love, "the teasing war with your lover" that you both enjoy is one
thing, feeling the energy mount you but not destroy you, instead, protect
you, is one thing, but the statement "I lust for war" can be so
misinterpreted, you're setting yourself up for such a subconscious attack,
saying you lust for destruction, instead of lust for life, the real
metaphor for your meaning of "war." How about saying "aggravated murder,
wall-smashed babies, tank-steel ridden blood marinated corpses" is what I
see in my babe's face, and let's see how you can still explain yourself
back into some loving reality. Destructive strength, that destructs enemies
as a form of protection, is a form of protection. During evolution such
strength would be sought out, and destruction was a nonissue. Unlike
anything before us, these days, we, humans, have the power for utter
destruction, to destroy every other living form on this planet, except say
algae as a food source, carefully monitored against mutations so that
nothing smarter than us evolves. That would be a form of safety, a form of
protection - wouldn't it be wrong? But strength that can moderate without
destruction, strength that allows and protects freedom, and fights for it,
strength that is accepting of difference, is an even bigger strength. I
hope you love other things than your very near immediate ego, be it
yourself, your family, your nation, your people, or even just humanity. I
hope your heart rejoices seeing salmon jump up waterfalls in their drive to
spawn, I hope you love the cricket chirp, the bird songs, the grass rubbing
up against your thighs, and even sharks feed or tigers chase, or snakes
hunt. That is not destruction, that is harmony and balance. Living among
other life, being part of other life, being a tiger, a chased antilope, a
shark, a chased bunny, a cricket, a bird, all at once, being hungarian,
spanish, native american, or african, chinese or indigenous australian all
at the same time, caring about it all, caring aboust justice to all,
justice to tigers, justice to sharks, justice to the bunnies, justice to
the native americans, is what should make you a human being, whose power is
bigger than destroying everything it could destroy.

Szilard

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Information about Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind

Poet: Stephen Crane
Poem: 1. Do not weep, maiden, for war is kind
Volume: War is Kind & Other Lines
Year: 1899
Added: Jan 31 2004
Viewed: 4337 times


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