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Analysis and comments on Pea Brush by Robert Frost

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Comment 7 of 67, added on March 9th, 2012 at 4:06 AM.
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Comment 3 of 67, added on July 2nd, 2007 at 3:31 AM.

The meaning I take from Frost's poem is a very literal one. Someone has
cut down a birch tree and suggested he come and clean up the branches
because he can use them to set his peas to climb on them in his garden. He
is a natural observer of nature's ways and he sees that if he doesn't
remove the downed brush soon, it will impede the growth of the new flowers
that are already coming up beneath them. He is killing two birds with one
stone, both cleaning up for the sake of what's beneath, and taking home
what can be utilized. It can be a metaphor for thriftiness, good
stewardship, environmental awareness, etc, etc, and definitely is a poem
that emphasises that we should make hay while the sun shines, not just let
things go to seed. Don't procrastinate, keep working, the good work of the
world revolves on such principles. I find it to be an upbeat and pragmatic
message.

ea
Comment 2 of 67, added on January 8th, 2007 at 7:56 PM.

I have to write a response on this poem and the other comment says that is
very hard to analyze. I learned that it means that cutting down birch
trees is crushing the wild trillium flowers. So, stop to take a look at
nature!

Adrian from United States
Comment 1 of 67, added on December 20th, 2005 at 9:55 AM.

it is very hard to analyze

sonilyn from United States

This poem has been commented on more than 10 times. Click below to see the other comments.
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Information about Pea Brush

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 13. Pea Brush
Volume: Mountain Interval
Year: 1916
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 9644 times


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