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Robert Frost - Maple

Her teacher's certainty it must be Mabel
Made Maple first take notice of her name.
She asked her father and he told her, "Maple—
Maple is right."
"But teacher told the school
There's no such name."
"Teachers don't know as much
As fathers about children, you tell teacher.
You tell her that it's M-A-P-L-E.
You ask her if she knows a maple tree.
Well, you were named after a maple tree.
Your mother named you. You and she just saw
Each other in passing in the room upstairs,
One coming this way into life, and one
Going the other out of life—you know?
So you can't have much recollection of her.
She had been having a long look at you.
She put her finger in your cheek so hard
It must have made your dimple there, and said,
'Maple.' I said it too: 'Yes, for her name.'
She nodded. So we're sure there's no mistake.
I don't know what she wanted it to mean,
But it seems like some word she left to bid you
Be a good girl—be like a maple tree.
How like a maple tree's for us to guess.
Or for a little girl to guess sometime.
Not now—at least I shouldn't try too hard now.
By and by I will tell you all I know
About the different trees, and something, too,
About your mother that perhaps may help."
Dangerous self-arousing words to sow.
Luckily all she wanted of her name then
Was to rebuke her teacher with it next day,
And give the teacher a scare as from her father.
Anything further had been wasted on her,
Or so he tried to think to avoid blame.
She would forget it. She all but forgot it.
What he sowed with her slept so long a sleep,
And came so near death in the dark of years,
That when it woke and came to life again
The flower was different from the parent seed.
It carne back vaguely at the glass one day,
As she stood saying her name over aloud,
Striking it gently across her lowered eyes
To make it go well with the way she looked.
What was it about her name? Its strangeness lay
In having too much meaning. Other names,
As Lesley, Carol, Irma, Marjorie,
Signified nothing. Rose could have a meaning,
But hadn't as it went. (She knew a Rose.)
This difference from other names it was
Made people notice it—and notice her.
(They either noticed it, or got it wrong.)
Her problem was to find out what it asked
In dress or manner of the girl who bore it.
If she could form some notion of her mother—
What she bad thought was lovely, and what good.
This was her mother's childhood home;
The house one story high in front, three stories
On the end it presented to the road.
(The arrangement made a pleasant sunny cellar.)
Her mother's bedroom was her father's still,
Where she could watch her mother's picture fading.
Once she found for a bookmark in the Bible
A maple leaf she thought must have been laid
In wait for her there. She read every word
Of the two pages it was pressed between,
As if it was her mother speaking to her.
But forgot to put the leaf back in closing
And lost the place never to read again.
She was sure, though, there had been nothing in it.
	 
So she looked for herself, as everyone
Looks for himself, more or less outwardly.
And her self-seeking, fitful though it was,
May still have been what led her on to read,
And think a little, and get some city schooling.
She learned shorthand, whatever shorthand may
Have had to do with it--she sometimes wondered.
So, till she found herself in a strange place
For the name Maple to have brought her to,
Taking dictation on a paper pad
And, in the pauses when she raised her eyes,
Watching out of a nineteenth story window
An airship laboring with unshiplike motion
And a vague all-disturbing roar above the river
Beyond the highest city built with hands.
Someone was saying in such natural tones
She almost wrote the words down on her knee,
"Do you know you remind me of a tree--
A maple tree?"
	 
  "Because my name is Maple?"
"Isn't it Mabel? I thought it was Mabel."
	 
  "No doubt you've heard the office call me Mabel.
I have to let them call me what they like."
	 
  They were both stirred that he should have divined
Without the name her personal mystery.
It made it seem as if there must be something
She must have missed herself. So they were married,
And took the fancy home with them to live by.
	 
  They went on pilgrimage once to her father's
(The house one story high in front, three stories
On the side it presented to the road)
To see if there was not some special tree
She might have overlooked. They could find none,
Not so much as a single tree for shade,
Let alone grove of trees for sugar orchard.
She told him of the bookmark maple leaf
In the big Bible, and all she remembered
of the place marked with it—"Wave offering,
Something about wave offering, it said."
	 
  "You've never asked your father outright, have you?"
	 
  "I have, and been Put off sometime, I think."
(This was her faded memory of the way
Once long ago her father had put himself off.)
"Because no telling but it may have been
Something between your father and your mother
Not meant for us at all."
"Not meant for me?
Where would the fairness be in giving me
A name to carry for life and never know
The secret of?"
"And then it may have been
Something a father couldn't tell a daughter
As well as could a mother. And again
It may have been their one lapse into fancy
'Twould be too bad to make him sorry for
By bringing it up to him when be was too old.
Your father feels us round him with our questing,
And holds us off unnecessarily,
As if he didn't know what little thing
Might lead us on to a discovery.
It was as personal as be could be
About the way he saw it was with you
To say your mother, bad she lived, would be
As far again as from being born to bearing."

  "Just one look more with what you say in mind,
And I give up"; which last look came to nothing.
But though they now gave up the search forever,
They clung to what one had seen in the other
By inspiration. It proved there was something.
They kept their thoughts away from when the maples
Stood uniform in buckets, and the steam
Of sap and snow rolled off the sugarhouse.
When they made her related to the maples,
It was the tree the autumn fire ran through
And swept of leathern leaves, but left the bark
Unscorched, unblackened, even, by any smoke.
They always took their holidays in autumn.
Once they came on a maple in a glade,
Standing alone with smooth arms lifted up,
And every leaf of foliage she'd worn
Laid scarlet and pale pink about her feet.
But its age kept them from considering this one.
Twenty-five years ago at Maple's naming
It hardly could have been a two-leaved seedling
The next cow might have licked up out at pasture.
Could it have been another maple like it?
They hovered for a moment near discovery,
Figurative enough to see the symbol,
But lacking faith in anything to mean
The same at different times to different people.
Perhaps a filial diffidence partly kept them
From thinking it could be a thing so bridal.
And anyway it came too late for Maple.
She used her hands to cover up her eyes.

  "We would not see the secret if we could now:
We are not looking for it any more."
	 
  Thus had a name with meaning, given in death,
Made a girl's marriage, and ruled in her life.
No matter that the meaning was not clear.
A name with meaning could bring up a child,
Taking the child out of the parents' hands.
Better a meaningless name, I should say,
As leaving more to nature and happy chance.
Name children some names and see what you do.

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Added: Feb 20 2003 | Viewed: 20487 times | Comments and analysis of Maple by Robert Frost Comments (11)

Maple - Comments and Information

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 5. Maple
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: Published/Written in 1923

Comment 11 of 11, added on April 11th, 2014 at 3:08 PM.
It depends on the tr

It depends on the trteemant you have. There is a book just out called You Can Beat Prostate Cancer written by Robert J. Marckini a prostate cancer survivor. The book tells alot about prostate cancer and then outlines all of the trteemants available today plus the Pros and cons of each including side effects.. It is a great book and any one with prostate cancer or prostate problems should have it.. It can be purchased at Barnes and Noble and on ebay I think plus some other places.I had Prostate Cancer in 2005 and was treated with Proton Radiation at Loma Linda Universtiy Medical Center in Loma Linda California.. Proton Radiation usually has no side effects and has about a 90% cure rate..I personally believe it is the very best trteemant available today.. It is very different from conventional radiation in that about 85-90% of the trteemant energy is released exactly at the point being treated. Therefore, surrounding tissues and organs are not damaged by the radiation as in conventional radiation.. therefore one has little to no side effects. Proton Radiation basically treats only the area needing to be treated. There is a website called Proton Bob(Bob stands for brotherhood of the ballon) The website is great ..if you or any a friend or relative have Prostate cancer .. please read the website.. and especially read the Patient Testimonial section.. Every one who has ever had Prostate Cancer and was treated with Proton Radiation is completely sold on it.. and why not.. it has no side effects and as good if not better cure rate than all the other trteemants..Many doctors have been reluctant to recommend Proton Radition, they didnt know about it, considered it experimental or it was a money thing.. you dont make any money sending your patients somewhere else for trteemants.. However some have started to take notice and can no longer ignore the amazing results that Loma Linda Univerty Medical Center has had with it over the last 17 years.. It is now being offered at several other hospitals and several trteemant facilities are currenty under construction.. It is offered at M D Anderson in Houston( just opened last may), Mass General in Boston(Harvard) a hospital in Jacksonville florida and one in Indiana I think.. the Proton Bob website gives all the locations There are some really bad side effects with most of the other trteemants. With Proton Radiation, it does not effect your sexual ability as most of the other trteemants do. I was not sick one day during the trteemants or any time after my trteemants.. it was like a vacation almost.. Only side effect I had was driving on interstate 10 out in California now that was bad!!!!Ohh my PSA is now .13 and dropping thats point one three!!!!If you have any questions any experience with Prostate Cancer or Proton Radiation, feel free to email me, I will also be glad to visit with you on the phone about it if you or a relative or friend has Prostate Cancer.. Having Prostate cancer was not that big of thing with me especially after having Proton Radiation.. It is a good and simple cure..

Chaimaa from Czech Republic
Comment 10 of 11, added on September 16th, 2013 at 11:01 AM.
enexyra

o nikos pinei iremos to kafedaki tou kapou sto syntagma,
kapoia stigmi vlepei to filo t to giwrgo kai pernaei apo
mprosta tou kai ton fonazei.
-giwrgo ela na se kerasw kafedaki kai na ta poume

-ti einai ola auta ta xartia pou exeis mprosta sou?

-logariasmoi giorgo mou eutixws tous eksoflisa kai to
apolamvanw....

-ti? kerdises to laxeio?

-oxi niko mou alla ekana kati pou mporousa na to kanw
eixe i gynaika mou kapoia kosmimata poume den ta forouse
kai kati skeuh asimenia pou den ta xrisimopoiousame,
ta peira loipon kai phga edw stin koloktroni 9 ston kurio
spiropoulo kai ta poulisa.
mou edwse kala leuta kai etsi eksoflisa olous tous logariasmous
mou kai tora to apolamvanw....

LogPanagiotis from Estonia
Comment 9 of 11, added on May 25th, 2013 at 12:04 PM.
Gains for a 4th Week in a Row, and Milestones, Too ujm

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) to treat men with symptomatic late-stage (metastatic) castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to bones but not to other organs. It is intended for men whose cancer has spread after receiving medical or surgical therapy to lower testosterone.

Prostate cancer forms in a gland in the male reproductive system found below the bladder and in front of the rectum. The male sex hormone testosterone stimulates the prostate tumors to grow. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 238,590 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 29,720 will die from the disease in 2013.

Xofigo is being approved more than three months ahead of the product¡¯s prescription drug user fee goal date of Aug. 14, 2013, the date the agency was scheduled to complete review of the drug application. The FDA reviewed Xofigo under the agency¡¯s priority review program, which provides for an expedited review of drugs that appear to provide safe and effective therapy when no satisfactory alternative therapy exists, or offer significant improvement compared to marketed products.

¡°Xofigo binds with minerals in the bone to deliver radiation directly to bone tumors, limiting the damage to the surrounding normal tissues,¡± said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA¡¯s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. ¡°Xofigo is the second prostate cancer drug approved by the FDA in the past year that demonstrates an ability to extend the survival of men with metastatic prostate cancer.¡±

In August 2012, the FDA approved Xtandi to treat men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread or recurred, even with medical or surgical therapy to minimize testosterone. Xtandi is approved for patients who have previously been treated the chemotherapy drug docetaxel.

Xofigo¡¯s safety and effectiveness were evaluated in a single clinical trial of 809 men with symptomatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that spread to bones but not to other organs. Patients were randomly assigned to receive Xofigo or a placebo plus best standard of care.

The study was designed to measure overall survival. Results from a pre-planned interim analysis showed men receiving Xofigo lived a median of 14 months compared to a median of 11.2 months for men receiving placebo. An exploratory updated analysis conducted later in the trial confirmed Xofigo¡¯s ability to extend overall survival.

The most common side effects reported during clinical trials in men receiving Xofigo were nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and swelling of the leg, ankle or foot. The most common abnormalities detected during blood testing included low levels of red blood cells (anemia), lymphocytes (lymphocytopenia), white blood cells (leukopenia), platelets (thrombocytopenia) and infection-fighting white blood cells (neutropenia).
12312
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gandigoBligma from Ghana

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