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Analysis and comments on Desert Places by Robert Frost

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Comment 29 of 199, added on March 8th, 2012 at 4:52 AM.
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FNykHn I really liked your post.Thanks Again. Really Cool.

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Comment 28 of 199, added on February 12th, 2012 at 6:25 AM.
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ChTqTn I must admit, the webmaster has written cool..!

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Comment 27 of 199, added on February 12th, 2012 at 5:30 AM.
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mi7Jrw The author deserves for the monument:D

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Comment 26 of 199, added on November 15th, 2010 at 2:00 PM.
hi

WOULD YOU HELP ME TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS BASE ON POEM OF "DESERT

PLACES" BY ROBERT FROST?
1. Which stanza is most negative? Consider synonyms.
2. How emotionally powerful is the word "scare"(line 13 and line 16)?
3. What multiple denotations of the word "benighted" are functional in the

poem?
4. How does the etymology of "blanker" add to its force in this context?
5. What denotations of "spirits"(line7) are relevant here?
6. Who are "they"(line 13) who can create fear by talking about the
emptiness of space? fear of what?
7. What are the "desert places"(line 16) within the speaker that may be
compared to literal emptiness of space?



ehsan from Iran
Comment 25 of 199, added on September 15th, 2010 at 4:02 PM.

hehehehehehe!!!! Halarious!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Elyse???????? from United States
Comment 24 of 199, added on February 11th, 2010 at 5:38 AM.
It's all bollocks:

Poetry is bollocks. It's some pompous ass who has convinced a bunch of
other pompous asses that there are layers upon layers of hidden meaning in
some b.s. lines he scribbled down one day while he was on a bender. If you
think you have to read something ten times and know how to pick up every
little poetic device in order to understand it, then you 1) are fooling
yourself and 2) need a hobby, preferably one that involves other people.

Fodao from United Kingdom
Comment 23 of 199, added on February 11th, 2010 at 5:38 AM.
It's all bollocks:

Poetry is bollocks. It's some pompous ass who has convinced a bunch of
other pompous asses that there are layers upon layers of hidden meaning in
some b.s. lines he scribbled down one day while he was on a bender. If you
think you have to read something ten times and know how to pick up every
little poetic device in order to understand it, then you 1) are fooling
yourself and 2) need a hobby, preferably one that involves other people.

Fodao from United Kingdom
Comment 22 of 199, added on December 26th, 2009 at 3:12 PM.
DESERT PLACES

WOULD YOU HELP ME TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS BASE ON POEM OF "DESERT
PLACES" BY ROBERT FROST?
1. Which stanza is most negative? Consider synonyms.
2. How emotionally powerful is the word "scare"(line 13 and line 16)?
3. What multiple denotations of the word "benighted" are functional in the
poem?
4. How does the etymology of "blanker" add to its force in this context?
5. What denotations of "spirits"(line7) are relevant here?
6. Who are "they"(line 13) who can create fear by talking about the
emptiness of space? fear of what?
7. What are the "desert places"(line 16) within the speaker that may be
compared to literal emptiness of space?


PUNCHI from Iran
Comment 21 of 199, added on December 26th, 2009 at 3:12 PM.
DESERT PLACES

WOULD YOU HELP ME TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS BASE ON POEM OF "DESERT
PLACES" BY ROBERT FROST?

PUNCHI from Iran
Comment 20 of 199, added on November 8th, 2009 at 2:12 PM.

Through the language and imagery Frost shows how the desolate and empty
landscape can make you feel alone, depressed and scared.

The whole poem is one massive piece of pathetic fallacy to show how the
persona is feeling, in particular the use of snow, whiteness and absence of
objects to convey his thoughts. The first clear sign of the persona’s
current emotional status is in the second stanza, “I am too absent-spirited
to count” and so we learn of the detachment and loneliness of his life and
so he can relate to the surroundings and sees everything as bad and alone
almost as if he is left bare, mirroring the landscape.
The is a sense that everything the snow touches looses form, shape and so
meaning, “the ground almost covered smooth in snow” the snow forms a
blanket over the land so only, “a few weeds and stubble” are visible. The
snow covers up the rest of the land and leaves only the more ugly things.
This shows how the snow is used in the poem to describe the loneliness and
absence of happiness as it has the ability to cover up all that is lovely
and pretty in the field.
This is built on in the second stanza when the snow is described as harsh
and cruel as, “all animals are smothered in their lairs”. This shows the
awesome power of the snow and so nature, at first the are a few sprinklings
but when built up it has the power to kill. This again disturbs the
persona and adds to his feelings on the snow as an agent of death and
destruction.
In the third stanza the word ‘lonely’ is repeated in various forms, “And
lonely as it is, that loneliness will be more lonely ere it will be less”.
This repetition really drives home the message that the persona is all
alone and is only a warning that the weather and his life can only get
worse before it gets better. This reference to his emotional deterioration
is a lot like the falling of the snow, it goes further and further down
until there is nothing left, “no expression, nothing to express”.
It is not just the covering up of the land and objects that scares the
persona it is also the absence of matter, “They cannot scare me with their
empty spaces”. Here it is the absence that makes him feel alone because
there is nothing for protection and there is a feeling of loneliness,
neglect and nakedness surrounding the thought of ‘nothing’.
At the end of the poem it seems like the persona is actually more afraid
of himself than anything around him, “To scare myself with my own desert
places”. In his mind there is his personal desert and it is reflected by
the landscape surrounding him. This shows how the loneliness can transcend
nature as he is more scared of what is inside his own mind than what is
outside and what potentially has more capacity to harm him.


Ollie Plunkett from United Kingdom

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Information about Desert Places

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: Desert Places
Volume: A Further Range
Year: 1936
Added: Feb 20 2003
Viewed: 1706 times


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