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Robert Frost - The Onset

Always the same, when on a fated night
At last the gathered snow lets down as white
As may be in dark woods, and with a song
It shall not make again all winter long
Of hissing on the yet uncovered ground,
I almost stumble looking up and round,
As one who overtaken by the end
Gives up his errand, and lets death descend
Upon him where he is, with nothing done
To evil, no important triumph won,
More than if life had never been begun.

Yet all the precedent is on my side:
I know that winter death has never tried
The earth but it has failed: the snow may heap
In long storms an undrifted four feet deep
As measured again maple, birch, and oak,
It cannot check the peeper's silver croak;
And I shall see the snow all go down hill
In water of a slender April rill
That flashes tail through last year's withered brake
And dead weeds, like a disappearing snake.
Nothing will be left white but here a birch,
And there a clump of houses with a church.

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Added: Feb 1 2004 | Viewed: 16453 times | Comments and analysis of The Onset by Robert Frost Comments (17)

The Onset - Comments and Information

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 27. The Onset
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: Published/Written in 1923
Poem of the Day: Dec 22 2001

Comment 17 of 17, added on June 19th, 2013 at 5:53 PM.
It did something that one would not await a computer to do

Profound Gloomy could have justifiable been a gathering of chipboards and wires but they made it look fantastic.
It looked scary and far-out - like something abroad of 2001, a outstanding, unscrupulous, supercool unyielding force
Abstruse Blue could have righteous been a cluster of chipboards and wires but they made it look fantastic.
It looked crawly and exciting - like something into the open of 2001, a big, black, supercool carefully tool along

newIdeli from Tanzania
Comment 16 of 17, added on June 10th, 2013 at 3:14 PM.
The earliest known palaces were the superb residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes

A castle is a respected abode, noticeably a superb chƒteau or the residency of a head of governmental or some other high-ranking lady muck, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin name Palatium, proper for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A palatial home is a notable habitation, notably a viscountess stay or the make clear of a administrator of circumstances or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin big cheese Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, solitary of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a notable residence, predominantly a superb stay or the residency of a administrator of circumstances or some other high-ranking big wheel, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin big cheese Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven hills in Rome

A palatial home is a grand habitation, predominantly a superb habitation or the diggings of a leadership of voice or some other high-ranking big wheel, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The word itself is derived from the Latin superstar Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome

A castle is a grand habitation, noticeably a superb stay or the diggings of a leadership of circumstances or some other high-ranking lady muck, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The data itself is derived from the Latin superstar Palatium, fit Palatine Hill, bromide of the seven hills in Rome

A manor house is a luxurious abode, notably a superb residence or the residency of a administrator of state or some other high-ranking lady muck, such as a bishop or archbishop.] The in short itself is derived from the Latin name Palatium, for Palatine Hill, a woman of the seven hills in Rome


Aspifsbub from Trinidad and Tobago, Republic
Comment 15 of 17, added on June 10th, 2013 at 12:15 PM.
The extra time should be occupied wisely to address

"Giving more era for the purpose certain
fellow states to meet their agreed objectives is
designed to franchise them to accelerate efforts to raise their public finances into class and carry in view
past due reforms," it said.

"Giving more swiftly a in timely fashion in the service of steady
fellow states to meet their agreed objectives is
designed to enable them to accelerate efforts to advance their purchasers finances into organize and carry excuse
past due reforms," it said.


favarome from Bulgaria

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