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Analysis and comments on Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

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Comment 96 of 1056, added on October 20th, 2005 at 2:01 AM.

He is thinking about suicide...

Jeremy from United States
Comment 95 of 1056, added on October 19th, 2005 at 9:46 PM.

As I see it, having read and reread this wonderful poem many times since my
first encounter at the age of seven, the woods--"lovely, dark, and
deep"--are beckoning to the speaker/narrator's unconscious desires, as if
seducing him to enter, possibly never to return. At the same moment, his
consciousness calls him back to the reality that faces every living
thing--the will to go on living, doing, being. After all, he has "promises
to keep." He has obligations and responsibilities, to others perhaps, and
to himself as a creature of the world with a passion to live. And with a
curiosity that seeks to know the mystery of death.

Don from North Carolina from United States
Comment 94 of 1056, added on October 17th, 2005 at 6:48 PM.

i think this poem is absolutely amazing. The way that robert frost portrays
suicide and determintation to continue in life is like....WOW!!!! i love
this poem

ana banana from Peru
Comment 93 of 1056, added on October 16th, 2005 at 1:59 PM.

Here is a story:
Our young teacher, Ms. Elizabeth lived happily, teaching us and devoting
her time to her husband, her family and her poetry. When we asked her why
she was always bruised up, she would look away from us and simply say that
she was clumsy and often fell down. We were no fools. Each day, as Ms.
Elizabeth came to class, we turned over and over in our heads the different
possibilities of why Ms. Elizabeth was so clumsy and fell down so much.
Some of us knew the truth before the others did; However, eventually
everyone knew, but no one said a word. Ms. Elizabeth came across "Stopping
by Woods on a Snowy Evening," by Mr. Frost. It was in the curriculum which
she had to teach us. One day, Ms. Elizabeth sat down and read us the poem.
She could not finish it because she broke into tears near the end and had
to use the bathroom. Each day afterwards, Ms. Elizabeth would try to read
the poem again and again, but she always broke out into tears. One day,
she finally gave up reading the poem and had us switch to another
assignment: making paper mache. Years afterwards, I took a poetry class in
college. My thesis paper was on the "poetry of Robert Frost and its
connection to everyday life". "Stopping by..." was one of the poems I
wrote about in my paper. I always interpreted it as a journey; it is good
to sometimes stop and admire the scenery, but I cannot let it slow myself
down too much because "I have miles to go before I sleep..." I think this
is the meaning Ms. Elizabeth was trying to believe, each time she read that
poem to us.

TjB from United States
Comment 92 of 1056, added on October 14th, 2005 at 4:00 AM.

Here, here Sam! Marvellous.

Dan...innit from United Kingdom
Comment 91 of 1056, added on October 14th, 2005 at 3:56 AM.

Absolutely Cracking

Sam Lovell from United Kingdom
Comment 90 of 1056, added on October 5th, 2005 at 1:05 PM.

This a poem I learned 3 years ago and I think it's a great poem!

Nae from United States
Comment 89 of 1056, added on October 1st, 2005 at 8:02 PM.

How do I love this poem? Let me count the ways! One of the things I've
learned about poetry and apply to this work is that the narrative voice of
the poem is not necessarily the voice of the poet. When Frost framed and
structured this work and chose meter and rhyme scheme and wrote and
rewrote, selecting the words that worked best for him, was he contemplating
a darker meaning of suicide and death? We don't know what he was thinking
outside of composing his work. We know what we think when we search for
metaphors and symbols and analyze their interpretation according to what
we, the readers, think of their meanings to us.
Perhaps to some the winter woods and frozen lake symbolize death. But, to
me those same words evoke a scene of beauty and a sense that there never
seems to be enough time to enjoy the simple beautiful things in life. Years
ago, having lived in up-state NY and close to New England, I had many
opportunities to watch snowfalls in quiet woods. A beautiful scene
beautifully told by Robert Frost.

Al Burnett from United States
Comment 88 of 1056, added on September 28th, 2005 at 3:36 PM.

This is my all time favorite poem by my all time favorite poet. I think
it's pretty simple. He's not really referring to stopping in the woods,
he's referring to death. He's tired and wishes he could just lay down and
sleep, but he has many things to do (many miles to go) before he 'sleeps'.
It almost makes me feel kinda sad.. --wipes tear-- lol.
~Leyla

Leyla from United States
Comment 87 of 1056, added on September 21st, 2005 at 1:16 PM.

About 40 years ago, my 7th grade English teacher made us memorize a bunch
of poems, including this one. I find it amazing that I can still recite
every one of them. What a great gift that teacher gave us! I also
remember that this one was very easy to learn because the rhymes follow a
pattern AABA BBCB CCDC DDDD (i.e., Here-Queer, Lake-Shake, Sweep-Deep).
In the years that followed, I have often pondered the poem's deeper
meanings. Like Bible verses, meanings often evolve a bit as the reader
grows older. In 7th grade, I thought it was just a nice story about a guy
and his horse stopping by a woods. Only the last line had a deeper meaning
for me... that he had a lot of stuff to do before he died. I think it's a
mark of great poem when children and adults can both get something out of
it. Sort of like baseball... it can be enjoyed on many levels, from
tee-ball to high school to the big leagues.

Mark Otterson from United States

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Information about Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 24. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 2542 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 26 2000


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