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Analysis and comments on Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

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Comment 123 of 1073, added on December 15th, 2005 at 4:45 AM.

It is winter solstice. A man on a mission takes a break. For a moment he
takes the liberty of admiring the beauty of snow starting to cover the
woods. As a member of the human race he is able to appreciate beauty. His
companion is not.

It is a still, silent and beautiful moment of solitude. Not even the owner
of the woods is near.

The horse doesn't understand why the man is taking this "unlogical" break,
and nervously reminds him to continue the mission, whatever that is.

As simple and beatiful as that. No death and no weirdness. Just an
atmospheric masterpiece written by a master.

//Matheus

Matheus from Sweden
Comment 122 of 1073, added on December 14th, 2005 at 1:12 PM.

I think that the horse symbolises the other part of his mind. half of him
longs for the serenity of death and the other longs to finuish life. Is
this a valid thought?

Steven Jewell from United States
Comment 121 of 1073, added on December 11th, 2005 at 3:34 PM.

“STOPPING BY WOODS…….”
This is a shy and embarrassed admission of adulterous temptation,
But, goaded by his conscience, he didn’t cave in.
Life must go on, but how could it with this guilt on his soul?
This is truly a masterful work using poetic imagery mixed with dream
symbolism
Carved into the memories of those of us who studied the work of art
As youngsters, not yet knowing the beauty or darkness of things to come.

Through the years the meaning has slowly come into focus to me.

I admire and love all his work. I have been fortunate to visit his farm in
Derry.
When I went to the house, they said he wasn’t home. He was down in the
woods,
Writing another poem.

John I. Earnest, Northeast Tennessee


John Earnest from United States
Comment 120 of 1073, added on December 11th, 2005 at 7:07 AM.

This beautiful poem seems to me to be related to 'Leisure' by W.H Davies
who asks "What is this life, if full of care/We have no time to stand and
stare?"
Here, the persona takes a few monutes to "stop" and admire a natural
phenomenon. The last three lines move beyond appreciation of nature to an
allegorical plane.While the idea of courting death---a dreamless
"sleep"---is certainly seductive, the persona realizes that he has
commitments and concerns which cannot be irresponsibly abandoned.In making
sense of the poem,let us not forget that each verse is rich in alliteration
and assonance. Sound echoes substance.

Suryakumari Dennison from India
Comment 119 of 1073, added on December 10th, 2005 at 9:32 PM.

I don't see any death in this poem but, rather a young man at a cross roads
in his life with a heavy burden. The man must make a decision over
something. Perhaps choosing between two women. i am now 51 years old. this
was my favorite poem in high school and is still my favorite poem.

Carolin Edwards from United States
Comment 118 of 1073, added on December 9th, 2005 at 10:09 AM.

This poem is definetly about santa clause. The only flaw is the horse but
that could easily be seen as a deer.

Mark from United States
Comment 117 of 1073, added on December 8th, 2005 at 12:53 PM.

After a certain period of time we all have to take the taste of death, this
is a hard reality. Poet believes it and he shows his optimism that we have
to finish our duties as well as we have to take care our responsibilities.
On the other hand death is a static thing like a frozen lake. Here he is
something pessimistic I think. However, he is such a great poet who can
draw life within death. This poem is the best poem I read ever in my
life.


K. M. Habibullah Masum from Bangladesh
Comment 116 of 1073, added on December 7th, 2005 at 3:26 AM.

The poem is gastronomically challenged and i think it may be about the
meaning of life.

Mimsy from Ethiopia
Comment 115 of 1073, added on December 1st, 2005 at 9:10 PM.

It seems essential to mention that the traveler is aware these are not his
woods, yet he knows the owner. He has left that "human" and "material"
world behind. He is in a dreamlike place where he is now aware of two
things: the woods filling with snow and the horse shaking his harness. One
silent and distant and one very real. His journey cannot stop here, no
matter how pleasant the idea. None of our journeys can. The snow will
fall and fill, but the horse and harness cannot be ignored. The traveler
knows what he has to do. Once he has left, once we have left, we must
finish what we have begun. There is no turning back. We can assure
ourselves of that.

Jacob Moore from United States
Comment 114 of 1073, added on November 30th, 2005 at 12:10 PM.

I think it is about the easter bunny because bunnies can hop and the eat
carrots

pimpin james from United States

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Information about Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 24. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 3395 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 26 2000


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