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December 21st, 2014 - we have 234 poets, 8,025 poems and 279,673 comments.
Analysis and comments on Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

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Comment 130 of 1060, added on December 30th, 2005 at 1:19 PM.

i am a child of 12 years, i sang this poem at my carol service, it was done
beautifully, i go to portora royal school, look it up

Jamie Blair from United Kingdom
Comment 129 of 1060, added on December 28th, 2005 at 2:10 PM.

I think that it's very possible for this poem to have more than one
meaning. However, I still have trouble agreeing with the notion that it's
simply about a late night ride in the forest. That could be all that Robert
Frost had in mind when he wrote it, but I doubt it. I also doubt this poem
is just about the beauty of winter, although it could be. I believe this
poem is symbolism of contemplating suicide and realizing that suicide is
not the way. I also see it as a poem about the importance of life and not
giving up. Suicide may not be the exact message, but I feel the message
definitely has something to do with life's struggles, giving up on life,
and questioning ourselves in our darkest moments. It's about our own
strength within us in times of heartache. Suicide, however, still seems to
me to be an obvious answer. This doesn’t mean Robert Frost himself thought
about killing himself. The inspiration for this poem could have come
elsewhere. Maybe he just wanted to get this poem out as a message of hope.
Maybe he knew someone who was going through a similar situation as the
speaker; a friend or family member. Whatever his reason for writing this
poem, I personally see it as very uplifting, positive, and inspiring. That
last stanza speaks to me. It speaks to anyone who has considered throwing
it all away. Assuming that it is about suicide, the fact that the speaker
has a change of heart and realizes that he in fact does have more to
accomplish before his time is done is beautiful. The message is clear:
never give up, ever. I love to read it when I am feeling sad. It picks me
up and reminds me that I can get passed it.

Nicole from United States
Comment 128 of 1060, added on December 23rd, 2005 at 12:44 PM.

I think its a santrat a cross-breed from santa and a rat. It CAN ride fish

Dolfrin from Finland
Comment 127 of 1060, added on December 22nd, 2005 at 5:56 PM.

This is definetly about a Kangaraffe a cross breed from asia of a giraffe
and kangeroo and they CAN ride horses. Yep thats what it is, indoubtbly.

JimMy from Fiji
Comment 126 of 1060, added on December 20th, 2005 at 5:19 PM.

I don't think this poem is about death and I don't think it is totally
about darkness either. There are some somber undertones to it, but out of
all of it comes hope and inner strength. Hope is the antithesis of
darkness and I think thats what makes this such an amazing piece.

Jay from United States
Comment 125 of 1060, added on December 20th, 2005 at 6:40 AM.

This is poem is very deep. Every time I read it, I discover something new.
It is definitely about death or sucicide. He has to choose whether to kill
himself or give up and die. Robert Frost is defintely an outstanding and
out-of-this -world poet

Chels from Trinidad and Tobago, Republic
Comment 124 of 1060, added on December 16th, 2005 at 3:37 PM.

this poem has a christmas tone to it. it is well described and well
done.Robert Froet is very good at rhymesing and this is a great example.I
admire and love all his work.As this poem shows not only his reaction to
the beauty that lies before him but in a sence the horses raction.This is
one of my faveourite poem.

aine from Ireland
Comment 123 of 1060, added on December 15th, 2005 at 4:45 AM.

It is winter solstice. A man on a mission takes a break. For a moment he
takes the liberty of admiring the beauty of snow starting to cover the
woods. As a member of the human race he is able to appreciate beauty. His
companion is not.

It is a still, silent and beautiful moment of solitude. Not even the owner
of the woods is near.

The horse doesn't understand why the man is taking this "unlogical" break,
and nervously reminds him to continue the mission, whatever that is.

As simple and beatiful as that. No death and no weirdness. Just an
atmospheric masterpiece written by a master.

//Matheus

Matheus from Sweden
Comment 122 of 1060, added on December 14th, 2005 at 1:12 PM.

I think that the horse symbolises the other part of his mind. half of him
longs for the serenity of death and the other longs to finuish life. Is
this a valid thought?

Steven Jewell from United States
Comment 121 of 1060, added on December 11th, 2005 at 3:34 PM.

“STOPPING BY WOODS…….”
This is a shy and embarrassed admission of adulterous temptation,
But, goaded by his conscience, he didn’t cave in.
Life must go on, but how could it with this guilt on his soul?
This is truly a masterful work using poetic imagery mixed with dream
symbolism
Carved into the memories of those of us who studied the work of art
As youngsters, not yet knowing the beauty or darkness of things to come.

Through the years the meaning has slowly come into focus to me.

I admire and love all his work. I have been fortunate to visit his farm in
Derry.
When I went to the house, they said he wasn’t home. He was down in the
woods,
Writing another poem.

John I. Earnest, Northeast Tennessee


John Earnest from United States

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Information about Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Poet: Robert Frost
Poem: 24. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Volume: New Hampshire
Year: 1923
Added: Feb 1 2004
Viewed: 2654 times
Poem of the Day: Jun 26 2000


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